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I was wondering if it is possible to make someone scentless for life with modern technology.

Requirements

  1. The individual's appearance must remain normal enough that they could walk down a street without anyone noticing.

  2. The person would need to be completely scentless to the closest examination.

Expense is no problem.

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to WorldBuilding Foxy! If you have a moment please take the tour and visit the help center to learn more about the site. Have fun! $\endgroup$ – Secespitus May 31 '17 at 20:55
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    $\begingroup$ A tip for the future: it's a good idea to wait at least 24 hours before accepting an answer to allow users of the site to have a look at your question and the answers. As of writing this your question was posted 40 minutes ago and only has 15 views. That's just a very small percentage of the people who use WorldBuilding.SE and live all around the world in different timezones. Some people might be discouraged from answering if there already is an existing answer. You might be surprised how creative WorldBuilders can be. Of course it's your decision when to accept. Just a hint for the future. $\endgroup$ – Secespitus May 31 '17 at 21:30
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    $\begingroup$ While I am honored that my answer has been selected, and %100 certain it is correct, @Secespitus is right so be sure to give it more time in the future. $\endgroup$ – Joe Kissling May 31 '17 at 22:25
  • $\begingroup$ Please define scentless. Scentless to whom? A trained dog? Different lifeforms can smell different things in different concentrations. What molecules should stop being emitted? Are you aware that a lot of scent is produced by bacteria on your skin and not by your body yourself? There are certain bodily functions - should they be "scentless" as well? What about wounds/cell necrosis? Should that process still remain scentless? One more example: Fat burning = smell. You are asking for a major intervention in the way people work here but don't give any information $\endgroup$ – Raditz_35 Jun 1 '17 at 8:21
  • $\begingroup$ sent less from you name it just generally that no one could detect you with dog other animals and also if possible also machinery $\endgroup$ – Foxy Jun 1 '17 at 11:02
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No

Your smell is the result of a whole bunch of different factors, some of which are: diet, pheromones, hygiene, genes, personal biome, and age. Short of encasing someone in a bubble, there is no preventing them from having a smell.

You are literally constantly leaving parts of you everywhere, that's how blood hounds track you. The Mythbusters tried and failed too.

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Scentless itself is a problem.

While many things are in pure form without scent, once they come in contact with dirt and bacteria, biofilms build which create own scent. If you like smells, you know that you need to test parfum on your own skin, not on neutral paper because it really changes dependent on skin. If you sniff materials in close distance, you will be surprised how many things actually have a scent: plastic, metal and wood.

So even if your body would be scentless, the bacteria and microorganisms living on your skin create scent (in fact we need those microorganisms on our skin, we live in symbiosis, they shield us against hostile organisms).

Solutions.

  • Skin varnish: Use some spray to build up a transparent, dull layer on your skin. Your skin does not need to breathe (Goldfinger is wrong in this regard), but it is also not really benefical to your health and it will be very uncomfortable if it is hot. Could be used to suppress your scent for hours.

  • Change scent: Once genetic engineering takes place, you could change the own smell and perhaps easier, sterilize your skin and repopulate with another composition of microorganism.

  • Android/Cyborg: The closest possible approach, replace your biological components with perfect mechanical doppelgangers without scent.

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