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According to Moore & Giles, the Egyptians invented the first leather as early as 5000 BCE.

And now word on the street is that a new kind of leather is being developed, made not from the hides of cattle, but the heads of mushrooms. It was already described as being breathable, pliable, naturally water-repellant and suitable for direct contact with human skin.

Now, Egypt doesn't have the right conditions for mushrooms to flourish, so let me ask you this--would a different Mediterranean civilization make leather from mushrooms around the fifth millennium BCE?

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    $\begingroup$ It doesn't seem like they use techniques available to a civilization back then. $\endgroup$
    – Mormacil
    May 30 '17 at 18:09
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    $\begingroup$ To nitpick that link implies Egyptians first used leather no later than about 5000 BCE (we have no older records) but it's pretty certain processing hides is older than that. $\endgroup$
    – user25818
    May 30 '17 at 19:18
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    $\begingroup$ That late 6th millenium BCE date is a terminus ante quem. The discovery of tanning almost certainly predates ancient Egypt by many millennia. $\endgroup$
    – AlexP
    May 30 '17 at 22:38
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No

"Mushroom Leather" is a modern material that happens to use fungus in its construction. While the article you linked is vague on how it is created (Especially since it used the dubious phrase "chemical free tanning method") it is a reasonable assumption that it requires modern techniques to fabricate.

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    $\begingroup$ Being tanning a chemical process, chemical free tanning method sounds like dehydrated water... $\endgroup$
    – L.Dutch
    May 30 '17 at 18:53
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    $\begingroup$ @L.Dutch yea, because herb chemicals are not chemicals, but unicorn magic! $\endgroup$
    – Mołot
    May 30 '17 at 19:37
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    $\begingroup$ mushroom leather requires precisions control of temprature, humidity, and a dozen other factors that is beyond pre-industrial technology. It is also a lot weaker than normal leather. $\endgroup$
    – John
    May 30 '17 at 20:22
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    $\begingroup$ @JohnWDailey of course! Who wouldn't?! Chemical-free biochemistry is a pile of dog .... so it is obvious it was written by someone who wants to sell that stuff, not by someone who cares about facts and being accurate. OK, maybe there is some kind of real leather as weak as mushroom one (so they could win a court trial if accused of false advertising) but overally it's just a commercial, not facts we can trust. $\endgroup$
    – Mołot
    May 31 '17 at 6:44
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    $\begingroup$ @JohnWDailey Do I doubt that an article, that is little more than an ad, will be forthcoming with all the products difficulties and flaws, of course. Its not hard to research it yourself. $\endgroup$
    – John
    May 31 '17 at 9:58

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