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I was thinking about a story where the sun light intensity decreases by 1/100 from its full intensity every day. So in 100 days, the sun just stop diffusing light.

I was wondering if the green plant on surface will have enough time to adapt and turn in sort of mushroom or if they will just die in month time after the sun shut down (it didn't explode [yet]).

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    $\begingroup$ Plants and fungi are only very very distantly related. Fungi are actually more closely related to animals than to plants -- mushrooms are more closely related to humans than to oak trees. Land plants and mushrooms have profoundly different biochemistry. $\endgroup$ – AlexP May 30 '17 at 9:02
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No.

Nothing adapts in 100 days to that kind of change. To "adapt", you need at least several generations (for a slight adaptation to a tiny change), and most plants aren't known to reproduce that fast. Plus, going from normal to absolutely no light in 100 days is really, really brutal a change. Nothing could adapt to this, even by reproducing twice a day.

Adapting is not magic, you can't go from green plant to mushroom just by sheer willpower. I suggest that you make some basic research in the field of natural selection.

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  • $\begingroup$ Nothing to add to that, have a +1 $\endgroup$ – Olaf Klausson May 30 '17 at 8:17
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They will not. 100 days is not enough time to evolve plants that can live without sunlight. Evolution requires many generations.

Now there might be some real-world examples: see this article:

Chemical analysis of effluent from the inaccessible subglacial pool suggests that its inhabitants have eked out a living by breathing iron leached from bedrock with the help of a sulfur catalyst. Lacking any light to support photosynthesis, the microbes have presumably survived by feeding on the organic matter trapped with them when the massive Taylor Glacier sealed off their habitat an estimated 1.5 to 2 million years ago.

I think you will favor survival of microbes that live deep underground already, not evolve new species in 100 days.

But in the short time span, you will see decay processes in action. The plants will die, and fungi will consume it. After that’s all been eaten, the fungus starves next (they eat each other until all the stored energy is used up).

For life to truely continue, it needs an energy source.

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    $\begingroup$ why are these good answers getting downvoted? $\endgroup$ – Olaf Klausson May 30 '17 at 8:31
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    $\begingroup$ @Olaf Klausson It appears that someone downvoted all the answers (that existed at the time) except Raditz_35’s. I saw them all drop just after I posted mine. Since then I see Mormacil got a second downvote. That does seem odd; it is a serious answer and downvotes are rare in WB. $\endgroup$ – JDługosz May 30 '17 at 8:45
  • $\begingroup$ Don't feed the fungus, ahem, the troll.. By the way, you wrote my answer just few seconds before I hit enter ;) $\endgroup$ – L.Dutch May 30 '17 at 9:13
  • $\begingroup$ @L.Dutch feel free to add to it! I think that’s the hazard with “easy” answers. $\endgroup$ – JDługosz May 30 '17 at 9:16
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No, adapting to such dark conditions will take many tens of thousands of years. Having a gradual decline isn't helping either. Evolution favors traits that help with the current environment, not the one of 80 days away. Regardless the speed of evolution is far to slow to have an impact here.

Plants will die in days I think after they stop receiving sunlight with the exception of trees. Trees will use their own oxygen supply and that can last for years. Smaller plants though will die out and with them all animals that depend on them for food. And with those gone a few months later all their predators will also die off.

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  • $\begingroup$ Food shortage won't be an issue. They'll have frozen solid long before then. $\endgroup$ – nzaman May 30 '17 at 11:22
  • $\begingroup$ For the predators yes but it takes weeks before the Earth would freeze over. $\endgroup$ – Mormacil May 30 '17 at 11:35
  • $\begingroup$ Animals will start dying off by day 6 (40% insolation). Plants will start to die off as the water in their stems starts to freeze. By day 13, the earth will have lost sufficient heat to space as to cause snowfall on the entire land surface. The oceans may take weeks to freeze over, but nearly nothing will survive on land $\endgroup$ – nzaman May 30 '17 at 12:33
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The first hole in your theory:

If the sun only shines 1/100th of the intensity, earths surface would cool down to below freezing extremely fast.

Plants would not adapt, everything would die.

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  • $\begingroup$ This is an interesting question open for debate. Take Lake Vostok (which might contain life) or bacteria found deep in earth's crust, organisms deep in caves. Most things would die, but how many? For some reasons scientists are currently researching this very topic (in a way). Maybe they have a plan ... $\endgroup$ – Raditz_35 May 30 '17 at 8:43
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    $\begingroup$ complex life as we know it can not exist in freezing conditions. Maybe some bacteria and other one-cell life, but surely no plants. Also, plants are only green because the sun emits the strongest in the green wavelengths. $\endgroup$ – Fl.pf. May 30 '17 at 8:45
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    $\begingroup$ Aren't plants just defined by their cellular walls? Also, in my home country they sell tomatoes that have clearly not seen the light of day - who knows what is possible and what companies are working on right now - fill windowless halls with tomato plants? Maybe the industrial tomato would survive - just one example $\endgroup$ – Raditz_35 May 30 '17 at 8:47
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    $\begingroup$ @Raditz_35 I don’t believe that tomatos can grow and produce fruit without ever having sufficient light for photosynthesis. $\endgroup$ – JDługosz May 30 '17 at 8:50
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    $\begingroup$ I removed the word in question $\endgroup$ – Raditz_35 May 30 '17 at 8:50
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Of course many green plants will turn into mushrooms. You can test that yourself. Get a plant (you can buy them at stores) and put it into a dark room, for example a cellar - but water it well. After a month, you will see that parts of your plant have turned into a white mushroom. We call it "mold"

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  • $\begingroup$ Not the plant itself turns into a mushroom. It just adds mold onto it. $\endgroup$ – Olaf Klausson May 30 '17 at 8:16
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    $\begingroup$ In fact, even WE can turn to mushroom ! The key is not to drink : in about a week, you will quickly start to adapt as a mix of some smelly bacterias, larvae AND mushrooms ! $\endgroup$ – Keelhaul May 30 '17 at 8:22
  • $\begingroup$ @Keelhaul Yes, this is also what will happen to us when the sun goes dark - in the long run. Mushrooms win I guess $\endgroup$ – Raditz_35 May 30 '17 at 8:22
  • $\begingroup$ @Raditz_35 then my english failed me and i chose the wrong words, sorry for that $\endgroup$ – Olaf Klausson May 30 '17 at 8:24

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