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This question already has an answer here:

I am creating an earth like planet with similar gravity and size and a new material has been created that can withstand the extreme temperatures and pressures of the earth's core! (Some hand waving on the subject of the material) the people of this planet wish to use it to create a low gravity atmosphere deep beneath the planets surface (hand waving on how they got that deep and on how they built the structure as they went) used to train astronauts, conduct experiments, etc. air circulation is accomplished with pumps and the extreme heat is kept at bay by a cooling system. This would work like a hotel sized elevator to get people in and out.

My question is, would this actually have low gravity and is there any additional hand waving I need to make this possible?

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marked as duplicate by kingledion, James K, James, Josh King, L.Dutch Mar 31 '17 at 17:52

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  • $\begingroup$ Wow can't believe I missed it this is slightly different because it has to do with technology and creating this cavern but thanks $\endgroup$ – Cameron Leary Mar 31 '17 at 14:55
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, no additional handwaving in needed, the gravity of the different parts of the planet cancel itself out. But a space station is way more easier. (And such temperature and pressure resistant materials would allow nuclear rockets with astronomic specific impulse, and therefore easy interplanetary travel.) $\endgroup$ – b.Lorenz Mar 31 '17 at 16:42
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At the center of the Earth, if you can survive the immense pressure and heat, there would be no gravity and you would float, you would have to go VERY VERY deep and a lot of hand waving around how you get through the mantle. However, in principal the science is sound.

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It has been addressed in this physics.stackexchange question. The closer to the core you get the less gravity you experience as the mass above you effectively cancels out.

While the effects of the force of gravity will be reduced, anywhere besides the exact center, there will be a force acting upon you. Even handwaving away the immense pressure, heat, and cost of construction, this isn't an effective way of training astronauts. The center of the earth is almost 4,000 miles away from us space is only 100.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks, I hadn't thought of the distance factor as being so large, that is quite suprising $\endgroup$ – Cameron Leary Mar 31 '17 at 14:57

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