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Assuming that there's not an issue with diseases spreading around, and that there's little to no issue with food allergies, what would the effects be of taking someone from a tropical climate to one that's cold and lacks a sun? They would be regularly exposed to small fractions of "sunlight," but no sun or true equivalent to a sun.

Edit: Sorry, I really should've explained the "fractions of sunlight" part better. Thank you for informing me! The background is that the sun (which was made via magic... alchemy I think? It's where you put a bunch of specific stuff together with some inherently magic things and it makes something) was a giant glowing flower (it makes more sense in context I promise) and when it died it left behind glowing pollen which basically everyone started collecting immediately, and they probably had quite a bit from beforehand too because hey, lanterns are a good thing to have. The pollen is not nearly full strength even if you managed to gather all of it in one place, but large quantities in a small area are capable of growing some crops and providing moderate warmth provided that the area is small and well insulated, but not enough to grow anything remotely tropical.

I hope that helps!

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  • $\begingroup$ People from tropical countries winter in the Antarctic. Aside from some vitamin D supplements, cabin fever is the worst thing they'll have to deal with. $\endgroup$ – Schwern Feb 23 '17 at 4:29
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    $\begingroup$ a complete lack of sunlight has been known to cause psychosis. Al least part of it due to vitamin D deficiency, but the upset of normal bodily rhythms and sleep cycles is also a factor. Proper use of artificial light can counteract this so it depends on what kind of technology they have. $\endgroup$ – John Feb 23 '17 at 4:53
  • $\begingroup$ Hello and welcome to WorldBuilding.SE! What do you mean by "small fractions of 'sunlight'"? If there is no sun I don't see how there could be sunlight. Also I would think that a planet with no visible sun would be really really cold. So is there some technology involved that allows the humans to survive? It would be nice if you could add some details. $\endgroup$ – Secespitus Feb 23 '17 at 8:22
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    $\begingroup$ Thank you John and Secespitus, I really should've explained things better than I did the first time around. I'll try not to make that mistake again. $\endgroup$ – So It Begins Feb 24 '17 at 0:23
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I grew up in the sub tropics. I ended up in Nebraska for a while and then England. You need to look up seasonal effective disorder (SAD). It is a very real depressive condition that is caused by the difference in the amount of sunlight you get from the amount you grew up with. It can be treated by things such as light boxes and high wattage incandescent bulbs but none of those are quite the same as getting as much sunlight as you grew up with. How people would handle the cold would depend on how well they are clothed and prepared for the conditions. Luckily I had access to proper clothing for the environment and was taught to dress in layers. If the individual(s) have to do things like drive or learn how to keep their homes warm without sufficient explanations it could cause a problem also.

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If you brought a large group. a portion would go mad (Cabin fever and SAD), a portion would beome sickley with some of those dying. Epigenatics would kick in for a few, especially the lighter skinned people who would absorb more sunlight and may eventually even thrive.

Overall, however, the survival rate would be low, and it would be very tough for those who did survive.

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If this is a high altitude location like many cold places, they may suffer from altitude sickness. A simple mistake would lead to quick hypothermia. They would be new to this cold weather. Water would be obtained from the snow. In this area, resources are scarce, so survival is not looking good.

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  • $\begingroup$ Water does not have to be "distilled" from the snow (or, better, ice). Just bring the snow or ice inside the house and wait. It will melt. $\endgroup$ – AlexP Feb 23 '17 at 16:51
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A retired paediatrician once told me that the 2 major cause of childhood rickets in the UK were:

  1. (Irrelevant to you) - 'Earth Mother' types breast-feeding their kids until they were 3 or 4 years old, and not supplementing the milk with foods containing enough vitamin D.
  2. Very dark skinned recent immigrants to the UK from the tropics, who had stuck to their traditional culture's diet, not realising that Britain's sunshine is rubbish at manufacturing vitamin D compared to their homeland's sun.

Both sets of parents were of course mortified that they'd tried to do the best for their kids and accidentally created a situation where they were deprived of vitamin D and got rickets. Altering the children's diet solved the problem.

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