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I'm wondering how things would have happened differently if it was perpetually raining over the entire surface of the earth. How would life have evolved differently? How would civilisation be different? Would technological progress be hampered? Would it be impossible to construct buildings? Would it prevent us from waging war?

Constraints: The water doesn't just come from nowhere. The usual rain, flow to the ocean, evaporate, rain, flow to the ocean, evaporate cycle is still going on, it's just that it's sped up by 1000000 times such that it is perpetually raining. In this way there shouldn't be a global flood (although I'm open to this happening if there is some other reason)

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome! This question is incredibly broad; you could write thousands of books on how Earth would completely change under these conditions - including evolution, topography, and civilization. $\endgroup$ – Zxyrra Feb 15 '17 at 2:31
  • $\begingroup$ In a science-based setting, something has to be speeding up the rain 1,000,000 times! Can you elaborate on exactly what does it, because that will probably impact the world just as much! $\endgroup$ – Zxyrra Feb 15 '17 at 2:32
  • $\begingroup$ Certainly human being could not even evolve as we know it. $\endgroup$ – Benoit Feb 15 '17 at 2:43
  • $\begingroup$ Our own Earth is such a planet. Although it isn't perpertually raining everywhere, at any given moment of time it is raining somewhere. $\endgroup$ – AlexP Feb 15 '17 at 2:46
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    $\begingroup$ @TheIronKnuckle How about the weather tag? :) $\endgroup$ – AngelPray Feb 15 '17 at 3:33
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Sped up by 1000000 times also means that rainstorms are shorter.

And somehow, water acts completely differently because it flows more quickly.

Then of course, it also means that the evaporation cycle happens much, much more quickly. That means higher heat, I'm afraid.

There will still be deserts.

Basically, you have to look into the scientific mechanism behind this before you even start. Speeding this process up messes with so very very very much on a fundamental level. If you'd like this to be science-based, look to that first--the temperatures at which these things occur, the dew point, all that. There's no JUST sped up by 1000000 times that can happen with ANY science that I know of.

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Well you need a lot more water, you need a much hotter oceans to keep it cycling, to the point it is boiling, there will also be less sun for plant life. Rivers will be massive, erosion will be way faster so you need either faster mountain building or end up with a flatter planetary surface.

the very early earth was actually a lot like this, basically the water boiled off the surface condensed and fell back to be boiled off again. Weather life can actually evolve under these conditions is... unclear.

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