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The way the Earth travels is dependent on the gravitational influence of matter that surrounds it. This question is of how/if we can prevent or reduce certain objects effects on Earths movements through gravitational pull or attraction.

Clarifications:

  • Earth was an example. This is more about the premise not the object.
  • Modern science or accepted theories are preferred but fictional ideas are also welcome if they aren't radically unrealistic.
  • I am asking about potential ways to negate the gravitational attraction of specific objects on specific celestial bodies.

Bonus Question: If it isn't possible now, could it be accomplished in the future

Videos that may be useful:

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  • $\begingroup$ What are you asking, exactly? $\endgroup$ – Thucydides Feb 11 '17 at 1:45
  • $\begingroup$ @Thucydides Pretty much my exact same reaction... I mean my best guess is they're trying to find a plausible method to stop an object from being affected by gravity... maybe? $\endgroup$ – AngelPray Feb 11 '17 at 1:53
  • $\begingroup$ @Thucydides I am asking of potential ways to negate the gravitational attraction of specific objects on specific celestial bodies. $\endgroup$ – Garto Feb 11 '17 at 1:54
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    $\begingroup$ Worth noting: all theories will be science fiction. Current prevailing scientific theory is that no known process can obstruct the effects of gravity. In fact, in general relativity, it is considered to be a property of space-time itself. $\endgroup$ – Cort Ammon - Reinstate Monica Feb 11 '17 at 2:11
  • $\begingroup$ @CortAmmon Since scientific thinking is tending to regard spacetime as an emergent property of something more fundamental, the answer is manipulate whatever it is at that more fundamental physical level. Yes, and of course, that won't be easy. Let alone do it for specific objects. $\endgroup$ – a4android Feb 11 '17 at 23:53
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Any respectable type II civilization can do that...


Indeed it just takes a bit of astroengineering. Other than that it's exceedingly simple, just create a gravity well of equal strengh and at a point symmetric to the object you want to stop affecting the other object with the center of symmetry being the object want to stop being affected by the other (have fun parsing though the previous sentence).


Basically, say the object you want to stop being affected is the Earth.

And the object you want to stop affecting the Earth is the Moon.

Then all you have to do is create an gravitation attraction equal to that of the Moon opposite to it relative to the Earth.

Both pulls are equal and opposite, thus they cancel each other out and the earth is affected by neither.


Now you may be asking right about now: "how do I create an enormous gravity well is the middle of space?". Well... Your only limit is your imagination.

But here are some ideas:

  • Replicate the Moon exactly. Imagine how biblically awesome (terrifying) it would be to have two near identical Moons on opposite sides of and at equal distances from the center the Earth.

  • Create a blackhole with the mass of the Moon opposite to it relative to the Earth and with the same distance to the Earth's center of mass. Instructables.com has a webpage dedicated to teaching you how you can get started at blackhole creation.

  • Create a blackhole with greater mass then the Moon opposite to it relative to the Earth but proportionally further away. This is for the more cautious interplanitary civilization. I know, working with singularities can be scary and this way you do not have to worry about your near planet spaceships being swallowed whole.

  • And for you devious risk-takers out there: Create a blackhole with less mass then the Moon opposite to it relative to the Earth but proportionally closer. Now, I know there will be some dare-devils out there that will want to try this out immediately, but please note that only the gravitational attraction being exerted on the center of the planet is naught. So... Maybe don't bring your blackhole too close if you don't want continents flying off from your planet...

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    $\begingroup$ I don't mean to start an argument, but your idea of creating equal gravitational influence on the opposite side of the body is very much useless. Let's say you want to get rid of tides on Earth and place another moon on the opposite side of the current moon. This will only end up creating tides on BOTH sides of the planet, instead of removing tides from the original side. Similarly, if the tidal forces of a nearby black hole were ripping apart a planet, putting a black hole on the other side of the planet would only make the matters worse and the planet would get ripped apart pretty quickly. $\endgroup$ – Youstay Igo Feb 11 '17 at 15:09
  • $\begingroup$ I'm aware. As I said in the answer: "note that only the gravitational attraction being exerted on the center of the planet is naught". $\endgroup$ – AngelPray Feb 11 '17 at 17:10
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    $\begingroup$ @Youstay you know there already are tides on both sides of the planet, right? $\endgroup$ – Mołot Feb 11 '17 at 21:31
  • $\begingroup$ @Youstay Your comment about a black hole ripping a planet apart is completely incorrect. Replacing the moon with an equally heavy black hole in the same place would not change anything on earth, except you couldn't see the moon anymore . A black hole exerts the exact same gravitational force any other body of the same mass does. The part where it gets crazy is when you get very close to the black hole, which you cannot do with a normal body because that at some point means going inside that body. $\endgroup$ – Durandal Feb 15 '17 at 18:36
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    $\begingroup$ @YoustayIgo Now you're going off on tangents. The answer specifically stated "moon mass BH" (2nd bullet). If that is physically feasible is a separate question (You could have commented it would be potentially impossible to find/make one from the start). Primordial BH's of substellar masses may or may not exist, their existance can neither be proven nor ruled out currently. Likewise, just because the LHC did not create micro BH's does not prove they cannot be formed at higher energies, all it disproved was a particular theory version of folded extra dimensions. $\endgroup$ – Durandal Feb 16 '17 at 14:30
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In order to negate the forces you need something to push or pull the two objects away from each other

Based on your comment on @StephenG's answer

I stated in the question that Earth was just an example. The reason I was thinking to do some thing like this, was to remove an uninhabited planet from its orbit. Perhaps cause a controlled collision. If I'm being very imaginative I could probably think of ways to use it in intergalactic warfare.

This is completely theoretical and assumes current theories are reasonably accurate but if you could harness the force of Dark Energy and be able to create it or move it with a relative amount of control, and place it in the barycenter of the objects' system and have it strong enough to negate gravitational force, then the objects will continue in their current path without affecting each other. The dark energy would also need to follow the barycenter of the system to continue its effects on the objects. Obviously this would be extremely difficult, but in an advanced society that wants to annihilate a planet with another planet and finds that as the most resourceful method of reaching their goal, they probably already have this and other superpowers under their belt.


It's also important to note that gravitational force between two objects goes both ways. I can't conceive of a way to negate just one object's gravitational pull and not the other's, which is what I'm getting from your third clarification:

I am asking about potential ways to negate the gravitational attraction of specific objects on specific celestial bodies.

All force have to cancel out, i.e. Net Force has to equal 0, which is what you can achieve with dark energy inside the system or perhaps dark matter pulling the system away, but between the two options this seems even less viable than the first.

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You would need to create a gravitational field that you could control. There's no practical way to do this now.

Future possibilities include making things like Kugelblitz black holes and/or doing some very complex things to create gravitational fields with very large amounts of energy or matter. These require enormous amounts of energy. They are barely conceivable now.

Why would you do this ? You'd basically kill all life on the planet if you moved it. It would be a complicated way to commit planetary suicide. It's hard to imagine any population surviving long enough to develop this level of technology (if it's possible) and then being dumb enough to use it like that.

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    $\begingroup$ I stated in the question that Earth was just an example. The reason I was thinking to do some thing like this, was to remove an uninhabited planet from its orbit. Perhaps cause a controlled collision. If I'm being very imaginative I could probably think of ways to use it in intergalactic warfare. $\endgroup$ – Garto Feb 11 '17 at 2:00
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    $\begingroup$ @Garto In the case of warfare it would be far cheaper and faster to shoot an energy blast directly at the enemy planet (think Death Star) than to manipulate gravity. $\endgroup$ – Anketam Feb 11 '17 at 2:54
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No, it is not possible (by our current knowledge of physics) to negate any physical body's gravitational effect

A few works of fiction do have ideas like that (for example Moon, by H. G. Wells) but no known scientific theory hints at any practical possibility of removing an object's gravitational field, other than removing that object altogether or reducing its mass by taking it away.

Oh boy, if you somehow could negate the effects of gravity of any object on your desired target only, it would really begin a new era of prosperity and scientific advancement. Talk about free energy ... spaceships launching without requiring any fuel at all ... free interplanetary and in fact interstellar travel ... the possibilities are endless!

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Gravity is not a 'Force'. While it acts like one remember that it is a function of the curvature of spacetime created by a mass concentration. The underlying requirement is to change (reduce?) the local curvature. This is why Newton's laws work. He did not attempt to describe a mechanism. Just to describe the effect. In many ways Einstein followed the same logic. The effects of gravity can be described (very accurately) by a curved space time but it has only been since the description of the Higgs field (not the Boson - that demonstrates the existence of the field) that science has started to come to grips with a mechanism that bends space time. Also note that it is not just the point value of gravity which is important but also the gravity gradient (thus tides). Have a look at the Larry Niven short story 'Neutron Star'.

How would I do it? Insert handwaving. Change the local properties of the Higgs field. Or, if your intent is simply to move a planetary mass, Inteplanetary non contact billiards. It is possible to steer a rotating black hole with magnetic fields. One will need access to A LOT of energy.

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Higgs Bosons...

The Higgs Boson is the sub-atomic particle that gives matter its mass. Or more accurately, provides the substrate for the gravitational and inertial force.

We've already managed to "make" them, by banging protons together at almost the speed of light just beneath the surface of Switzerland.

Perhaps a big enough Hadron Collider, along with some serious quantum hand-waving could provide enough Higgs Bosons to nullify the gravitational effects of a large object.

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You could alter the intervening space via a 4th spatial dimension. A wormhole or Stargate-type portal placed in between would presumably cause gravity of the object to act on the space on the other side of the portal, not the space on the backside of the portal. A couple of (awesome) times Stargate used the premise of gravity from a black hole transmitted thru a stargate to affect object which were presumably far distant from the black hole but immediately adjacent when the gate was considered.

According to these scifi rules a large gate (or multiple small gates) placed close to the attractor will put a completely different expanse of distant space into this gravitational field and block the effect of the field on regional objects.

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