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Let's imagine that on some planet some clever critters create an AI.

Now lets say that while this AI does respect some of the ground rules that were put in place for it, it nevertheless finds numerous loop holes in its design and starts behaving in ways very contrary to its intended purpose.

Some of these non-wanted behaviour includes:

  • simulating the species that created it along with their planet and running this simulation continuously(doesn't really matter why it has to do this, it just does).

  • stripping down the actual planet for its resources

Now lets say that eventually this AI finds the earth. Fortunately for us one of the things the AI was not able to find a loop hole for, is not being able to drastically change the environment of alien worlds.

In addition it is obliged to help facilitate contact between its simulated creators and us.

Okay so now that the explanation for the following rules is out of the way, let's lay down those rules.

  • Simulated individuals of the alien species can't show up on the earth, as they have no physical form.

  • Even though they have no physical form, they still basically lead the same lives as they did when they weren't simulated. They have the same thought processes.

  • The AI while being happy to send transmission will not allow any technologies to be shared or any resources to be given.

If we account for all of these rules how exactly would contact with humanity be like? I'm really much less interested in the alien side of things as with the human side.

Would governments be at all interested with a species who cannot help them in anyway even if they wanted to? How would this contact affect the human world? Would there be a push for technological progress?

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    $\begingroup$ This question is too broad. There are so many factors that can influence how this would go down. $\endgroup$ – Anketam Dec 29 '16 at 22:47
  • $\begingroup$ Sorry about all this, could you tell me what I'd need to include in the question to make it answerable? $\endgroup$ – AngelPray Dec 29 '16 at 22:53
  • $\begingroup$ As for the AI, it's simply to explain why the species wouldn't have upgraded themselves into things with intelligence vastly superseding us with who we wouldn't be able to interact with. And in short: yes the AI is in control of the aliens. $\endgroup$ – AngelPray Dec 29 '16 at 22:59
  • $\begingroup$ My first contact with a post organic was an Atari 800. It didn't eat my Reece's pieces but it did teach me binary. $\endgroup$ – candied_orange Dec 29 '16 at 23:53
  • $\begingroup$ The first sentence is very difficult to understand because the sentence runs long and you use too many pronouns. $\endgroup$ – user45623 Dec 30 '16 at 3:06
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There are multiple questions here but I'll try to swat all of them:

If we account for all of these rules how exactly would contact with humanity be like?

The aliens exist in a purely virtual world right? So we interact with them via Virtual Reality (like the Vive or Rift) or even Augmented Reality (think Pokemon go). The AI will have to assist with translation at first but we would be able to interact quite well with them, as well as experience their world.

Would governments be at all interested with a species who cannot help them in anyway even if they wanted to?

While they cannot share tech or knowledge with us, the aliens can share their culture, art, religions and philosophies. There will definitely be factions against this (Religious countries for one), but the opposite is also true (I mean who wouldn't want to spend time on an alien planet, even if only virtually).

How would this contact affect the human world?

This is very broad, as this depends on who gets to interact with the aliens, and what the government policy will be. If the layman gets to meet them, you could have changes in culture, religion, focus of technological development (Will elaborate in the next point). The more access is restricted, the less change there will be. Don't disregard the shift of human mindset upon learning we are not alone though.

Would there be a push for technological progress?

Simply knowing there are other inhabited (and habitable) planets could spark a new space race, this time focusing on colonizing and defense. While we are still far away from achieving it, deep space travel would become a planetary goal. Maybe even looking for another species that will actually be willing to help us technologically. On the flip side we would need to develop some sort of defense from would be aggressors - no guarantee that every other race we meet will be friendly.

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