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How do you cut through an unbreakable armor? With an all-powerful sword, of course. No really, if we had seemingly unbreakable matter (lets give it the original name of Unobtadamentium, or Uium for short), could we process it with, say, tiny black holes as cutters and tiny white holes as hammers/anvils?

I'm writing a shorty on a typical long-time-ago-galaxy-far-away war, where good-guy and his nemesis must join together to find a way to process Unobtadamentivaibranium - the nigh-indestructible material from which apparently invincible armor and shields - as well as all those wbuilding.stack questions about them - are made.

There are ancient alien structures around the galaxy that were (even longer-time-ago, possibly in a galaxy-farther-away) made from this mysterious Unobtadamentireallystrongium, but no man made tool can shape the material, no man made weapon can even damage it. The powers that be figure that they can make near-invincible space ships, if they can reshape the stuff into such.

I looked at Micro black holes, and White holes and I wonder if they're good candidates for the apparatus to create Uium in the first place, by placing a set of holes on various sides of some material, and using the gravitational push and pull to cram as much density as possible into one point in space. If so, they can be used to reshape Uium, in a similair way.

Assuming white holes exist, and that the apparatus doesn't slip from softish science into fantasy (I know, I know), I'm thinking:

  • Micro black holes, each with the mass of our earth's moon, smaller than the size of the dot at the end of this sentence.
  • Micro white holes, each with an anti-mass (and resulting grav push) of the moon.
  • Uium must be dense enough to withstand a hundred consecutive modern nuclear strikes. It's what comes up in my mind as a good measure for "nigh-indestructible" and "no man made weapon can even damage it". If you have better ideas I'd love to hear them, but bear in mind that sending the stuff into the sun, or striking it with a bazillion gazillion nukes, is not practical. Uium must have some breaking point for it to be processed, but not a crazy overkill (just some general relativity tweaking..)

My question is: What would be a viable black or white hole density to Uium density ratio (or in other words, what density can I set for Uium)?

Edit: The guys aren't able to create black holes, I'll decide later on how much they're capable of getting their hands on such and manipulate them. Might decide that they only find the documentation on the ancient aliens' methods of dealing with Uium but sigh in despair upon realizing that these methods are beyond current human tech.

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    $\begingroup$ Forget about black holes already ;) They are not "strong", they "absorb" pretty much everything it approaches $\endgroup$ – fffred Dec 20 '16 at 18:14
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Density isn't the main thing to consider here. Take gold, for example. It's pretty stable atomically speaking, it hugely dense, but you can bend it with your fingers and burn through it with a blowtorch. Even Tungsten, which is dense, tough and incredibly heat resistant, can be cut with acid.

Your unobtanium had properties that go beyond being dense. If it's 'indestructibility' is a plot point of yours then the methods for manipulating it are also plot points of yours. Science won't really help you here.

The material that you're suggesting sounds a lot like a super-stable form of degenerate matter, in which case manipulation of gravitational fields sounds like a good way to go and the densities that you're looking for are in the same range as Neutron stars (3.7×1017 to 5.9×1017 kg/m3), but the exact configuration of the matter is exotic and somehow prevents neutron degeneracy pressure from blowing it apart again, as well as giving it other 'indestructible' properties that you can decide on later (reducing it's gravitational pull might be good unless you want people being torn apart by tidal effects whenever they get close to it).

I will say though that you've already set the bar for 'crazy overkill' pretty high when you posited that these people are capable of creating and manipulating lunar mass black holes. These guys seemingly have control over the laws of space and time, materials engineering really isn't going to be too much of an issue for them. If they want to create a gravitational field capable of battering matter into an exotic degenerate state I'd say they can just do that rather than first creating a gravitational field capable of battering matter into not one but two different types of singularity, then somehow manipulating that to batter matter into an exotic degenerate state.

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  • $\begingroup$ That's some good input, definitely sending me back to study. As for the last paragraph, the guys aren't able to create black holes, I'll decide later on how much they're capable of getting their hands on such and manipulate them. Might decide that they only find the ancient aliens' methods of dealing with Uium but sigh in despair upon realizing that these methods are beyond current tech. Edited the question to clarify this. $\endgroup$ – Nahshon paz Dec 20 '16 at 12:02
  • $\begingroup$ Sorry if the last paragraph was confusing: I meant that the aliens could skip having a black hole and just use whatever ungodly powerful tech they used to make the black holes to make the Uium directly. Black holes that light shouldn't occur in nature. $\endgroup$ – Joe Bloggs Dec 20 '16 at 12:07
  • $\begingroup$ Well how am I supposed to know what went on through the aliens' mind? :-) Probably a second grade school science project. $\endgroup$ – Nahshon paz Dec 20 '16 at 12:25
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    $\begingroup$ "Now Blort, you need to finish your quantum relativity homework before you can go out and play planet-pong with your friends" $\endgroup$ – Joe Bloggs Dec 20 '16 at 12:28
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    $\begingroup$ @JoeBloggs That depends on certain parameters. Bump them all over to the particle side, and you get some interesting effects other than what you specify. $\endgroup$ – nijineko Dec 29 '16 at 17:16

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