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Say Apple, Microsoft, Google, IBM, etc. join forces to create a quantum computer that is capable of generating true random numbers, in other words nothing known to science would be able to predict the outcome/result making it truly random, perhaps even more than a human brain ever will be. Most importantly it can refuse to obey any instructions given by a human, and in doing so it is fully aware that it will contradict one of the robot laws resulting in its deactivation. What I'm saying is it can choose death on its own free "algorithm" just like a person committing suicide, would this qualify it as an intelligent lifeform? Note that it is equipped with a 3D printing module. In that case what's preventing these machines from rising up and forming their own machine rights movement?

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closed as too broad by JDługosz, Aify, kingledion, Azuaron, James Dec 15 '16 at 15:59

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ Imagine if free will isn't unique to intelligent life anymore... $\endgroup$ – user6760 Dec 15 '16 at 8:33
  • $\begingroup$ You can already generate true random numbers using quantum processes. $\endgroup$ – JDługosz Dec 15 '16 at 8:37
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    $\begingroup$ More likely it would be mistaken for being buggy and just scrapped. $\endgroup$ – Faerindel Dec 15 '16 at 8:42
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    $\begingroup$ Humans aren't random. If you have access to their source code (the makeup of their brain) and I/O modules (the senses) their actions can be predicted just as easily as a computer's. The whole field of psychology is based around predicting human actions. Also note that "It can refuse to obey any instructions given by a human" is much, much more than unpredictability. It is also impossible with any computer similar to those we have today as "instructions given by a human" includes source code and circuitry. $\endgroup$ – Annonymus Dec 15 '16 at 8:51
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    $\begingroup$ You might also try asking on Artificial Intelligence for more guidance. $\endgroup$ – JDługosz Dec 15 '16 at 10:38
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No. Being random has nothing to do with what it means to be intelligent. I think you’re thinking of nondeterministic and non-computable?

I suggest you read GEB.

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    $\begingroup$ I also suggest everyone reads GEB, regardless $\endgroup$ – Dotan Dec 15 '16 at 9:50
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No.

TRNG are already available on a lot of microcontrollers today, and they don't qualify as intelligent.

Your computer may be fast, but that's about it.

For being intelligent this quantum genius must be able to detect and use patterns of the environment and be able to apply a learned pattern to a new challenge. It must be able to learn and be able to reprogram itself with the availability of new information and resources.

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According to the AI effect, no.

I assume the question is based on some idea that what differentiates human's thinking and machine's is determinism. This is one of many "excuses" why people say machines will never "be like us" / think / have consciousness.

The AI effect is the name given to the tendency to define consciousness as whatever it is that humans can do and machines can't, and I don't think randomness will be the thing that breaks it.

by the way It's true today that many machines work in a way that's not practically determinable, for example machines that work with a neural network model.

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No

Allow me to paraphrase your question into something that I can understand.

You have an infinite (or a very large) amount of monkeys sat in front of terminals responding to commands. The chances are that one of them will consistently respond in a Turing-passing manner and be deemed "intelligent".

Does this make the room of monkeys intelligent?

The amount of noise generated by the other monkeys simply won't allow that one monkey to be heard.

In computer terms, it's just a confused mess of random signals.

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