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I have a situation where an insider tells an exclusive story about a huge government scandal to a small time radio host who tends to exaggerate things. The time setting is before social media.

Will the news spread or it will be dismissed as conspiracy theory?

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    $\begingroup$ No idea. It depends on countless variables. $\endgroup$ – AndreiROM Nov 29 '16 at 20:32
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    $\begingroup$ Are we talking about a radio show like Coast to Coast hosted by Art Bell (pre-social media)? If so, then no... and that's despite the coast-to-coast coverage the show received. Pretty much anything said there would be written off. I think you would have to have the story heard by a more legitimate journalist who would then dig into the story (rather than just accepting its true), discover supporting documentation, and send the story to Reuters or something. $\endgroup$ – GrinningX Nov 29 '16 at 20:42
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    $\begingroup$ Depends on the scandal, if it's something that's hard to check or something that mainstream media doesn't want to cover like Rotherham tinyurl.com/j9n8ywb it probably won't. $\endgroup$ – Silur Nov 29 '16 at 20:45
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It largely depends on how people view the radio station. If they always tell the truth, but just overestimate everything, than people will assume it is not as bad as the host says. If it is JUST the host the people don't trust is accurate, and they hear the insider talk about it, that will give them SOME faith, but it also depends on the record of how reliable his guests have been.

In short, it depends on the radio stations reputation. Better reputation means more people hear it, and more people spread it believing it to be true. (From your description, I assume the story would most likely be blown off as an minor event blown out of proportion)

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