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Let's assume that a method for FTL has been found, and for whatever reason, it work. Given our current knowledge of physics, what would be the consequences? For example, under what circumstances would events occur out of order from different reference frames?

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  • $\begingroup$ This has been discussed in detail already. See this answer in oarticular for links and tutorial. $\endgroup$ – JDługosz Nov 28 '16 at 4:20
  • $\begingroup$ This is a good question but it is very broad - asking "what are the consequences of x" with something on this scale will provide a ton of possible answers (also results in opinion-based) $\endgroup$ – Zxyrra Nov 28 '16 at 4:22
  • $\begingroup$ «For example, under what circumstances would events occur out of order from different reference frames?» always. You can choose two reference frames such that two given spacelike-separated events are in one order or the other, and choose a third where they are simultaneous. $\endgroup$ – JDługosz Nov 28 '16 at 4:24
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If you consider FTL travel in the light of our current physical knowledge the current set hypothetical methods are: wormholes, Kerr black holes, the Alcubierre warp drive. Krashnikov tubes, and tachyons (definitely not so popular these days).

Problems with FTL include causality violation, relativistic mass increase prevents crossing the lightspeed barrier.

You can search the tag for FTL on this SE for other information about FTL travel. You will note FTL questions tend to get closed quickly in this neck of the woods.

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