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At the center of my small (one million star maximum) galaxy, there is an incredibly enormous light pillar, originated from a ridiculously huge super-construction. The stars orbit around the giant object as if it was a supermassive black hole. I want to justify its existence with the following:

Several light years away, the emitted beam is received in two other constructions. They are smaller by logarithmic scales, yet they consume enormous amounts of energy. They are also equipped with billions of receivers that listen to a transmission encoded within this beam.

Therefore, the pillar is a constant beam of high-energy electromagnetic waves. I have several issues with it, though:

  • Of course, to make it possible, the beam itself must have a wavelength of the visible light - at least this is my assumption. Am I wrong?

  • Redshift and blueshift are not factors here - at least I think so, as everything's orbiting around this pillar. Again, am I wrong?

  • Is visible light suitable for data transmission the way radio waves are? My assumption is yes, as optical cables are a thing for almost several decades now, but I'm skeptical that the same system would work in space, where light is spreading and escaping in every direction.

  • Is it possible at all, to have a light pillar that is visible even from light years away? Do not imagine the scale of the Milky Way, 1-100 light years are "enough" for me, in this case.

Technically, these are multiple questions but are related to the same phenomena - which is actually inspired by pulsars, so some statements regarding them might answer this question perfectly. (but fix me if I'm wrong)

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  • $\begingroup$ Could you elaborate on "My world has a center.."? Is this a planet connected to two other planets? Is this a solar system? Is the universe revolving around this? etc $\endgroup$ – Zxyrra Nov 17 '16 at 22:52
  • $\begingroup$ As @Draconis said in an answer, light is not visible by itself. If you shine a laser pointer, for instance, you don't see the beam produced - or if you do, there is dust in the way. Therefore, to see this beam of light, there needs to be something in it. Consider a beam of plasma or something physical / solid. $\endgroup$ – Zxyrra Nov 17 '16 at 23:00
  • $\begingroup$ @Zxyrra oh, sorry for not clarifying - this is a very-very small galaxy, consisting 10 million stars maximum. They are orbiting around the gigantic object I mentioned, as if it was a supermassive black hole. $\endgroup$ – Katamori Nov 17 '16 at 23:19
  • $\begingroup$ Oh my...I overestimated by one scale, edited. I meant ONE million at best. $\endgroup$ – Katamori Nov 17 '16 at 23:25
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  • Of course, to make it possible, the beam itself must have a wavelength of the visible light - at least this is my assumption. Am I wrong?

High-energy radiation, while not visible itself, can ionize atmosphere to create visible light. It won't happen in space though.

  • Redshift and blueshift are not factors here - at least I think so, as everything's orbiting around this pillar. Again, am I wrong?

Unless the orbit is perfect circle, red-shift and blue-shift should occur. It should be easy to compensate for though, if it is strong enough to disrupt the signal in the first place.

  • Is visible light suitable for data transmission the way radio waves are? My assumption is yes, as optical cables are a thing for almost several decades now, but I'm skeptical that the same system would work in space, where light is spreading and escaping in every direction.

The light does not "escape everywhere". It can get dispersed on particles in the atmosphere. It should be possible to transmit data with laser through open space.

If light is not getting dispersed on anything(like a gas cloud), your pillar won't be visible. The signal would need to be strong enough to compensate for that loss.

  • Is it possible at all, to have a light pillar that is visible even from light years away? Do not imagine the scale of the Milky Way, 1-100 light years are "enough" for me, in this case.

Hardly imaginable. Things visible from light years away are called "stars". If your signal is losing enough light to be as bright as a star, it would need to be ridiculously powerful.

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  • $\begingroup$ So there is clearly no solution for justifying this without "magic", thank you. $\endgroup$ – Katamori Nov 17 '16 at 23:27
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It sounds as though this pillar is visible from all around as an enormous beam of light. But this means that light must be escaping in every direction, or being deflected off something in the beam (dust, air, nanobots). Neither of these helps you receive a good signal at the other end.

Optical transmission is usually designed so that as little light escapes as possible. You would want an incredibly focused beam to get useful information out at the other end; "spilling" light everywhere would run counter to that.

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