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On this hypothetical world the niche that would be occupied by plants is instead occupied by fungi living in symbiosis with cyanobacteria and/or algae.

For example, the tissues of the tree analogues are actually mycelium, highly specialized in a manner similar to the zooids of siphonophores.

How plausible is this scenario? What other adaptations would the lichen be expected to have?

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A good jumping off point might be Lichens of the Pacific Northwest - Oregon USA Lichens aren't just flat and scaly, but can be stranded, tubule, or coral looking. I think your idea is plausible, so far as you've explained it. I don't know if they'd technically be actual lichens, but they may be very lichen like. The adaptations would depend on their environment. Global temps, type of star, moisture levels, etcetera...

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