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I was watching a science show with facts about the sun and one of the facts stated that if we could hear the sun from earth, it would sound like a train horn constantly blaring at us. I have also heard recordings of Jupiter making sound that NASA recorded.

The scenario

Assume some kind of substance comes into existence that encompasses the entire solar system all the way to Pluto. This substance is a medium for sound to travel but otherwise does not interact with the solar system and allows for it to stay exactly the same.

The Question

What would we start to hear if the space in our solar system could suddenly allow for sound to travel? would we hear the sun or other objects such as Jupiter if you were orbiting it?

Addition info This is for a story about humans using sound for propulsion instead of rockets and I am trying to describe what a solar system that sound could travel in

EDIT: I have included this link describing how nasa "listens" to planets

https://solarsystem.nasa.gov/galileo/sounds.cfm

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    $\begingroup$ You might want to add this link to your question as it describes the method and process of translating magnetic impulses as sound. $\endgroup$ – user10945 Oct 28 '16 at 15:20
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Such a substance is going to make your physics difficult, to say the least. Read up on the "Luminiferous_aether" and then think about the problems of an aether which can transmit sound waves, and thus mechanical force.

What we'd hear from the Sun, if this worked as you seem to be imagining, would be white noise at lowish frequencies from all the turbulence on its surface. However, in reality, this would be undetectable over the ongoing sonic boom of Earth's movement through the medium, and the sound of people panicking as Earth began to slowly spiral in towards the sun.

You need to loose the "reality-check" tag if you want such a solar system to exist for long enough for planets to form, never mind for life to evolve.

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    $\begingroup$ When I read the question, I was waiting for an "echoiferous aether" of some sort. $\endgroup$ – Ghotir Oct 28 '16 at 17:30
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What NASA, and likely the science show, are describing is measuring the radio wave radiation from the Sun and then converting it into sound, analogous to what your run-of-the-mill radio does. The Sun and planets themselves do not radiate sound waves; the vacuum of space does not allow for their transmission.

Now if you did have some medium for sound wave propagation, you might be able to hear sound from the Sun or planets, IF they have some sort of vibrational modes, or pressure waves. I would think that this would be unfeasible either due to being too low frequency or too low amplitude (don't forget radius squared dispersion).

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This was written when the question still had the Reality-check tag!

Let's assume the substance comes into existence within one second.

To transmit sound, it has to be able to form compression waves, so it has to have a mass and consists of particles.

To suffice the basic physical laws, the easiest such substance has to react like any gas under the gas formula (pV=nRT).

The idea, that it should not interact with the matter of the solar system, besides sound transport, has to go out of the window to suffice the hard science that you need to achieve sound transport (presence of a somewhat dense particle medium that can interact with other matter via compression waves).

Outer Solar System

The particles come into existence without any movement on their own. Immediately they start to get pulled towards wherever is a gravitational potential, accelerating on the way. As they pass in towards the gas giants, those grow and Jupiter becomes a second sun once it has accumulated enough mass. Still, the biggest gravitational pull comes from the sun, and everything not eaten by the gas giants will go there. Just like the gas giants themselves, as the added mass starts to change their orbits lower and into a decaying one. It will take them some very long time to reach it though.

Close to the Sun

On the other hand, particles closer to the sun start to gather in the corona for some months, over the time superheating and insulating it a bit. Once they got heated enough, layers of particle plasma get thrown at the solar system.

On Earth

After having heard months of harsh hissing wind (ripping away some not too small part of the atmosphere with it into the sun) you would hear one loud bang as the plasma wave passes earth on its way from the sun outwards at high-speed, washing over the earth. As it passes earth (and creates that ear shattering sound) it rips another large huge chunk out of the atmosphere to follow it.

Assuming that you didn't lose your hearing under the influence of that initial, 140+ dB shockwave, everything starts to become much more silent as the atmosphere thins out, suffocating you.

Should you survive the compression wave and lack of air, the earth would end without any atmosphere and in full silence. Atop the lack of atmosphere, the wind towards the sun and then the plasma shockwave have had enough friction on earth to throw it into a decaying orbit around the sun. If everything comes to worst humankind also had to deal with a lunar impact. But luckily, most humans died already from radiation bathes when the ozone layer was stripped during the phase of intense 'wind' towards the sun.

Congratulations

The existence of such a substance would throw our solar system back to the situation when it was born! It would do a really good job at destroying humankind - and earth.

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I'm taking your idea of an interplanetary substance that can transport sound for granted, here. ;-) You won't hear a lot, a guess.

A loudspeaker with the angular diameter of the sun (0.5°) (as "seen" from your ear) cannot be very loud, if it doesn't have a horn or something, but emits in all directions.

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This post suggests that the sun would be a nearly immediately defeaning 125 decibels if we could hear it.

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