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I am a clockmaker: I work with time and can control it on a small scale.

One of my powers allow me to return some minutes back in time after having experienced my death, but I remember everything that happened.

What psychological problems can reach me repeatedly living this experience?

EDIT: A note to clarify something. It is not used on a voluntary basis. If I try to kill myself, I will return back to the time before the attempt. I didn't grow old so I didn't die from that.

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  • $\begingroup$ This is not quite analogous, but The Last Witness by K. J. Parker is about a guy who can transfer your memories into his mind. And if you die while this is happening... well, it's not a pleasant experience. It's a quick read, and available as an e-book. $\endgroup$ – Azuaron Aug 18 '16 at 12:02
  • $\begingroup$ The anime/lightnovel series Re:Zero has a similar premise. Remembering the pain, gore, death of friends and loved ones would really play on your mind. $\endgroup$ – CEObrainz Aug 18 '16 at 12:22
  • $\begingroup$ Does this mean the clockmaker has died and is repeatedly going back in time a few minutes and dying again and again? If so, this is going to push his stress levels to the maximum. $\endgroup$ – a4android Aug 18 '16 at 12:49
  • $\begingroup$ No, he return to a save point. (Usually the point where he can scape from that death) If you die from a long time disease, you can return five years to past? Well, I have not thought about that yet. $\endgroup$ – Malkev Aug 18 '16 at 12:55
  • $\begingroup$ one doesn't simply experience death... death is death and there's nothing to experience about it. $\endgroup$ – Charon Aug 18 '16 at 19:50
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Shell shock, battle fatigue, operational exhaustion...

...no, wait, these days it is called Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

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  • $\begingroup$ It was the first thing I thought, but just knowing that you are in some way immune to that trauma, may cause other symptoms. I'm wrong? It's like some time of immortality. Anyway, probably the correct answer. $\endgroup$ – Malkev Aug 18 '16 at 13:03
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    $\begingroup$ Well knowing that you are — in essence — immortal will probably have a profound effect on your psyche. Obligatory reference: hitchhikers.wikia.com/wiki/Bowerick_Wowbagger :D $\endgroup$ – MichaelK Aug 18 '16 at 13:08
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In my opinion, it would depend on the causes of the deaths, and the possibility to overcome such causes, after all, you would not want to be trapped in an eternal loop of being burned alive in a locked room to which you have no way of escaping. That aside, there are other variables, like, if a loved one dies, would you kill yourself and try to stop that from happening? What if, no matter how many times you tried, you failed? That would lead to a hard depression and feeling of uselessness. The pain caused by the process of death is of great impact as well, you could develop some kind of phobia to a particularly painful type of death. But in a long period of time, I believe the character would become like a vampire is often portrayed, he would realize that pain is temporary, and if he's careful enough, he could live the life he wanted, do whatever he wanted and be successful in anything by simply redoing it everytime and fixing the mistakes of his past. He would become numb after taking all he wanted.

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