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Assuming language is a barrier when it comes to socializing. How would people socialize?

How would they be mean to each other?

How would they sound at all?

When I say language, I mean the code, the sense to which our mind interpret things.

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closed as primarily opinion-based by sphennings, wetcircuit, rek, Magic-Mouse, Mołot Feb 12 '18 at 9:08

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ What definition of language are you using? And would humans still be capable of language? If they were, the languages were simply lost somehow, humans would simply generate a new language from gestures and vocalizations. $\endgroup$ – Ville Niemi Dec 6 '14 at 22:02
  • $\begingroup$ People spend so much time texting each other nowadays that sometimes it seems that speech is obsolete. Note: Social commentary! Social commentary! $\endgroup$ – HDE 226868 Dec 6 '14 at 23:48
  • $\begingroup$ Do you mean no verbal language? Or would you count sign-language, writing, and art as well? $\endgroup$ – Emmett R. Dec 7 '14 at 2:55
  • $\begingroup$ Yes please elaborate on what you mean by 'no language'. $\endgroup$ – bowlturner Dec 7 '14 at 13:14
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    $\begingroup$ Sorry, but cats and dogs can both interpret human actions and voices to understand our intentions and communicate vocally or with actions their own intentions. They usually do not have much to communicate beyond "Give food, now, you slave!" or "Let me out" but they do not really seem to have problems with the basic concept of communicating. If no language means no grammar or sentence structures, cats and dogs would probably be a good model for your answer. Effective intelligence would also be similar, I think. $\endgroup$ – Ville Niemi Dec 7 '14 at 13:50
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Already today, a huge amount of our communication is done through what is called social cues. Some of them are verbal (intonation, fluctuation, volume...) and other are non-verbal (eye gaze, body posture, gestures, facial expressions...).

There is an entire field of study, social sciences, that tries to investigate how people "socialize", to use your own term. To these scientist, communication is done through a broad range of ways, some can be called language and some can't but the limit is blurred when you look at it closely.

People draw stories from the stars, from music... in the same way you can "see" a face in three dots on a piece of paper. You are wired to use anything for communication.

I believe your question cannot be answered.

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  • $\begingroup$ I would add that, according to the broadest definitions of language, 'sending and receiving signals,' as Sajjad seems to ask about, even creatures without a nervous system can communicate through chemical means. A creature that could not process any form of signal whatsoever would have to be completely cut off from its environment, or more inert than a typical plant, which can produce chemical and visual markers to communicate with other species. $\endgroup$ – Emmett R. Dec 7 '14 at 22:44

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