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Is it possible for nanobots to become so integrated with a creatures biology that they could be transferred via the creatures reproduction and passed on to future generations? 'Synthetic Biology' looks promising, but it did not cover inheritance of traits.

Here are some links on Synthetic Biology:

http://www.nanalyze.com/2013/08/what-is-synthetic-biology/ https://www.bio.org/articles/current-uses-synthetic-biology

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    $\begingroup$ Is it possible? Yes. Does it exist? No. And since it doesn't exist you can invent anything you want, really. $\endgroup$ – AndreiROM Aug 5 '16 at 18:27
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I can think of two possible ways this could work.

  1. The nanobots could be physically present in the reproductive cells or transferred from the mother during gestation and would then have to reproduce and spread through the developing organism's cells.

  2. The nanobots modify the host cells DNA to make the host cells reproduce them, similar to how a virus reproduces, but a more symbiotic relationship would be needed to prevent the cells death. More like mitochondria or other cellular components reproduction than viruses. This would be much more difficult to implement but could be possible.

Note: If your nanobots can spread this way, they would likely be communicable similar to diseases, not just inheritable.

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Sure, take a look at mitochondria and chloroplasts. They have their own DNA but they work as a part of cell to everyone's advantage. They once were separate organisms but were trapped in a cell and it worked out just fine.

You could also take a look at newborn babies' immune system and how it's coached by mother's immune system through breastfeeding.

If your nano-machines are self-replicating, there's a good chance that they'll replicate themselves into reproductive cells too and thus be inherited.

If they are not confined to cells but, for example, travel in bloodstream - again, while the baby is formed and his blood system is somewhat connected with mothers, they'll get there.

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If you think of bacteria as "natural" nanobots, then this already happens.

Within the womb, there's little-to-no bacteria because the placental blood barrier does a pretty good job of keeping things out, while allowing antibodies in so the baby can fight any infections that slip past.

During birth, however, all that breaks down and the baby acquires the standard human gut bacteria from the mother on the way out the birth canal. C-section babies tend not to get this bacteria, which has led to a number of hypothesis regarding natural vs. c-section babies and immunities, allergies, and college GPAs, but that's a whole other thing.

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