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Think stuff like plant only pokemon, Groot (Guardians of the Galaxy), veggie pygmies (D&D), etc

How would people react to the fact that a vast majority of their veggies and fruits being much more mobile (or potentially so) than they are now?

Keep in mind that just because something is mobile, doesn't necessarily mean it's sentient in the traditional sense of the word, it simply means that it is able to move under its own power.

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    $\begingroup$ How wide spread are we talking this to be? Is this a common feature of plants or just a few? $\endgroup$
    – Durakken
    Commented Aug 4, 2016 at 2:03
  • $\begingroup$ @Durakken everything that once was rooted now is mobile (or potentially so). You could plant XYZ crop, but it might wander off if not properly taken care of $\endgroup$ Commented Aug 4, 2016 at 2:04
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    $\begingroup$ Sooner or later the triffids will get you $\endgroup$
    – Separatrix
    Commented Aug 4, 2016 at 7:14
  • $\begingroup$ Don't forget the Ents in Lord of the Rings, and their herds of trees $\endgroup$
    – AndyD273
    Commented Aug 4, 2016 at 13:16

2 Answers 2

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Farming would look a lot more like herding. This would be interesting because you could drive your crops to market, let them out to pasture, etc.

Picturing cropboys driving potatoes from Idaho to the rail head in Kansas to ship back east.

Or the famines caused when the corn just decides it wants to migrate south.

Another big change would be problems with wandering trees going where you don't want them, tripping, taking out power lines, walking into traffic...

So yeah, the world would be a different place, but not all bad.

Also, check out sea anemones, which have both plant and animal DNA, and kind of fit what you're talking about.

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    $\begingroup$ I was about to call shenaningans on the anemone remark. But then I googled it and now I can't get to sleep. Nice point. $\endgroup$ Commented Aug 4, 2016 at 4:54
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    $\begingroup$ Great first line for a book: "When I was 14 my Pa was killed when the beets stampeded, making me the man of the house..." $\endgroup$
    – AndyD273
    Commented Aug 4, 2016 at 14:23
  • $\begingroup$ @AndyD273 people would be like "what? how?" I think the idea would have to be introduced to them on the dust jacket $\endgroup$ Commented Aug 4, 2016 at 19:51
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    $\begingroup$ @JesseCohoon That "what? how?" is kind of what you're looking for though. It's the hook that makes the reader want to keep going to see what what's going on. Little more detail from better minds: The Hook of Your Book. Writing The First Chapter. Anyway, that's just my take on it. Though now I kind of want to write a vegetable western. $\endgroup$
    – AndyD273
    Commented Aug 4, 2016 at 20:02
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All of human history would change due to farming having no real benfit over hunter gathering.

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    $\begingroup$ would this include the fact that some things might be able to be tamed to stay put if treated properly, but would take special skills/ knowledge to do so? $\endgroup$ Commented Aug 4, 2016 at 2:10
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    $\begingroup$ Farming is already an abstract concept. Add to that the abstraction of husbandry and it pretty much is never going to occur to anyone to ever attempt $\endgroup$
    – Durakken
    Commented Aug 4, 2016 at 2:13
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    $\begingroup$ Given that we developed taming animals long before farming crops. If anything we'd pick up farming even earlier in human history. $\endgroup$ Commented Aug 4, 2016 at 6:22
  • $\begingroup$ domestication began at the same time for both animals and plants... $\endgroup$
    – user23754
    Commented Aug 4, 2016 at 7:20

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