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In movies, novels, fictions and mythologies, it is quite often told/seen/heard that the blood of the gods are that of gold.

I want to know how does gold colored blood works in biology, what are its chemical compositions, what makes it gold?

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    $\begingroup$ Ummmm... magic. It's just magic. Asking what it would be like in the real world is like asking what a diamond unicorn would be like in the real world and whether or not its shit would sparkle. $\endgroup$ – Z.Schroeder Jul 31 '16 at 8:20
  • $\begingroup$ i'm asking how gold colored blood works in reality... $\endgroup$ – mico villena Jul 31 '16 at 8:22
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    $\begingroup$ Well they are usually called en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ichor and not golden blood but they do function as a form of blood I guess? It would require some special chemicals and evolution in reality but I guess it's not impossible but implausible since we have blue blood from horseshoe crabs and invisible blood from insects. $\endgroup$ – Skye Jul 31 '16 at 8:25
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    $\begingroup$ @Sky Having taken blood from a locust, I assure you it is not invisible! That would have made the experiment very difficult! :-) I assume you mean transparent? $\endgroup$ – DrBob Jul 31 '16 at 9:01
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    $\begingroup$ Color descriptions in myths can be quite fanciful, so golden doesn't necessarily mean that it looks like gold, it might just as well mean that it's yellow. And as such the blood could function with chlorocruorin or coboglobin instead of hemoglobin. $\endgroup$ – Martine Votvik Jul 31 '16 at 9:58
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Coboglobin

Coboglobin is currently a synthetic protein that performs the same function as hemoglobin. It uses Cobalt in place of the iron atoms.

Blood of this type would be amber yellow in color when in the veins while uncoloured and clear in the arteries.

Quoted from Jim2B on Other blood colors

This the closest thing I can remotely find that's even close to the color of gold. But I recommend giving up on a suitable answer cos it would take a alien creature or some other unknown substances to really make gold blood. Or you could take all that gold from Smaug, melt it and voila.

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    $\begingroup$ As colour, amber is already quite close to gold (Wikipedia gives #FFBF00 for amber and #FFD700 for gold). If you don't see a god actually bleeding, but only see the amber veins through the gods' skin, what you see would certainly be compatible with golden blood. Of course if you see a god bleeding, then you would additionally need to give it a metallic gloss. Note that the gloss-causing component need not be the same as the colour-giving component. $\endgroup$ – celtschk Jul 31 '16 at 14:51
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    $\begingroup$ Our venous blood is a dark red, but it looks blue in our veins. If venous blood were golden, it might look green in veins. And of course in air, it would look uncolored or clear. Perhaps Chloro-carbonyl-bis(tri phenylphosphine)-iridium would have fit better. $\endgroup$ – Brythan Jul 31 '16 at 16:39
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According to Wiki...

The blood of some species of ascidians and tunicates, also known as sea squirts, contains proteins called vanadins. These proteins are based on vanadium, and give the creatures a concentration of vanadium in their bodies 100 times higher than the surrounding sea water. Unlike hemocyanin and hemoglobin, hemovanadin is not an oxygen carrier. When exposed to oxygen, however, vanadins turn a mustard yellow.

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    $\begingroup$ I cannot even tell if you are providing a single link or a complete bibliography. In both cases we prefer to have the content in the answer. $\endgroup$ – L.Dutch - Reinstate Monica Sep 21 '17 at 9:39
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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to WorldBuilding.SE! This answer would be much better if you included the relevant information from the literature in your answer, instead of a single paragraph followed by a giant incomprehensible wall of references. $\endgroup$ – F1Krazy Sep 21 '17 at 9:41
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    $\begingroup$ Welcome res! Please try to focus on the most important points to answer the question and write those points into your answer. Then you can and should link to where you got the information from for users who would like to know more about the topic. You just copied a lot of stuff and by looking at the links I can see that some are broken because of the formatting and other issues. It looks like you answered the question and so I am voting "Looks okay" (low-quality review queue). Please edit your answer, take the tour and visit the help center to learn more about how the site works. Have fun! $\endgroup$ – Sec SE - clear Monica's name Sep 21 '17 at 10:39
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    $\begingroup$ This answer is copied from something. We need the original source cited and the content moved into a quote block. Until then, this is a copyright violation. $\endgroup$ – Brythan Sep 21 '17 at 13:20
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While you could look at it from a literal aspect (the blood is colored like gold), you could also look at it as a metaphor. In real life, there is "Golden Blood". Rh[null] blood is so rare, less than 45 people in the world have it and it can be used as a true universal donor, even for the people that O- blood normally can't help. I know you wanted the literal side of things, but I was beaten to that answer, so I hope this makes for a nice second best!

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