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Imagine a Hyperintelligent guy in the early years of WWII. He is far beyond human capabilities. Things he is capable of:

  1. Absolute perfect recall. Every moment he has ever experienced is available for use.
  2. Instant calculation. This guy can instantly perform dozen-digit calculations in his head. He can determine the trajectory of every moving object in motion around him, the wattage of every bulb in the room.
  3. Incredible leaps of deduction (haven't really figured out the specifics of this one yet).

I'm asking what superintelligence would look like independent of fancy gadgets and unrealistic hacking capabilities. What would this person be able to do, with the aforementioned abilities in the aforementioned age?

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  • $\begingroup$ Is this hyper-intelligent human born in that age, all of his abilities are genetical ? or is he from the future, and travel back to WWII ? $\endgroup$
    – Chinu
    Jul 30 '16 at 2:56
  • $\begingroup$ This isn't an answer, but a reference to check out: look here mindmistress.comicgenesis.com $\endgroup$ Jul 30 '16 at 21:06
  • $\begingroup$ Probably much like a hyper-intelligent person in the information age, or a non-hyper-intelligent one outside the age... that is, they will probably look much like a person. Intelligence is internal and doesn't usually come with obvious visual distinctions - unless you put them there. :) $\endgroup$
    – Megha
    Jul 31 '16 at 5:39
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Sherlock Holmes. You're describing Sherlock Holmes, at least in some of his incarnations. I'd look to that for inspiration. The fight scenes in the Robert Downey Jr. one mimic this.

Hyperintelligence doesn't actually cover most of the things you are describing in many settings. Rather, I would say it's a combo-platter of Mega Perception & Mega Intelligence, with a dash of Mega Dexterity, if he is actually able to move out of the way of a falling object in time rather than merely calculating it. Trajectory of Moving objects isn't actually intelligence--being able to work out where things WILL BE as they move in space is really something that the best warriors and athletes have had. They don't do it consciously and math isn't involved.

You could say that intelligence covers all aspects of our interactions: there's EQ, which is a kind of social IQ, an ability to understand human relationships and use them. There's spatial intelligence, which you covered in #2, which is only really useful if you have the reflexes to back it up.

Creative thought isn't the same as eidetic memory. This fellow has both.

I'd make him a spy, honestly. A glimpse at a piece of paper, and bam--straight to his hard drive. The ability to memorize in an instant, and deal with complex coding in his head? Priceless. There are machines that do that before and during WWII--this fellow will be able to do it in his head.

He'll be good at chess and an excellent war strategist--if he remembers armies don't always move according to what's logical.

A creative thinker looks at the options the universe has given him and then--thinks of something else entirely.

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  • $\begingroup$ I would think he'd be smart enough to anticipate the enemy's possible moves and which one they would choose. I mean, he's still a human and he'll probably have a knowledge of psychology. $\endgroup$ Aug 15 '16 at 20:49
  • $\begingroup$ @XandarTheZenon This depends on how you define super intelligence. He could know for sure that the enemy general will do XYZ; so, your superhuman commits all of his forces to respond to that exact situation... except, the enemy general has a cold that day, and choses to do something else instead. Now your superhuman's forces are so committed to a specific strategy, that they get creamed by anything else. The problem with people who are always right is that they stop planning for when they are wrong. $\endgroup$
    – Nosajimiki
    Dec 22 '19 at 5:50
  • $\begingroup$ @Nosajimiki-ReinstateMonica It isn't smart to count on conditions remaining the same in battle. A plan, as they say, never survives contact with the enemy. : ) $\endgroup$ Dec 22 '19 at 6:09
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Superintelligence would be both more complex and subtle than the suggested abilities you have given your person with a giant mind. In fact, total recall is a handicap rather than an asset. There is a famous study of a Russian afflicted with a total recall memory. if I find it I will add in an edit. As for being a super-calculator, again that doesn't very much at all. Even WWII mechanical calculators could do as well. He could get a job as a computer with that calculating skill. A computer in WWII was a person who did the long, laborious calculations associated with scientific research or actuarial tables. This sounds more like an idiot savant than an intellectual superman.

As for the power of making deductions, again this is overrated. Deductions are often a poor way of thinking through problems. Sherlock had his Doctor Watson, but more importantly he had his author, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, on this side to ensure everything came out right.

If you want to construct a superintelligent person, consider the full gamut of intellectual and cultural skills where learning and problem solving are at their highest. The capacity for languages, mathematical skills, the sciences, linguistic skills in writing and talking, the ability to persuade people, to tell jokes, a deep psychological understanding of people, and strategic planning (by this I don't mean simply military tactics, but the ability to plan how complex activities or organisations can be done or run). Foremost among the abilities and skills of any superintelligent person would be his ability to learn anything and everything extremely fast.

He will have a habit of coming up with totally unexpected solutions to problems. This will be due to his superlative level of creativity.

It is an open question whether his superintelligence would extend to controlling and facilitating his motor skills because if it did he would be the best athlete or sportsman in the world.

Also, if he's really smart, he will have learned long ago how to conceal his superintelligence, and to blend in with normal human beings.

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A hyper smart individual could be mistaken for a witch, or a psychic. With minimum information, the person can make intuitive leaps that, to others, look like mind reading or seeing the future. Hyper intelligence is not just a difference in speed or wit; hyper intelligence is a difference IN KIND. A helicopter is not just a faster bicycle, the helicopter can do things that the bike rider can not even envision.

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I'd Agree with Sherlock Holmes, But I'd Add that his skill would be somewhat like The winter soldier. His features would maybe like the winter soldier. You're tracing during WWII, IF he is a soldier, then I would think he would make himself as ripped as he could due to the fact that we humans have certain limitations when we do not flex our muscles, then i'd think he might have innovated some of the machines that are available for that time, somewhat like McGyver, but these machines would kill. I'd also add that we would specifically be a infiltrator due to the fact that whatever inconvenience he might encounter, he would have a answer for everything. He might also be a strategist during that time. But if the individual did not participated in the war, he might be a scientist, or a engineer, which would definitely become either side's alas due to his intelligence. creating something out of little things to bring great advantages. In my opinion, that human could've been anyone if he wishes to, because he has the mental capacity to do so, and whatever comes about to him, he will find ways.

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He would look like everyone else... perfectly average. World War II was a bad time to be brilliant. Peaceful insights into the nature of existence such those postulated by Albert Einstein were converted into weapons of devastating destructiveness.

Your hyper-genius would be smart enough to realize that the moment people realize just how bright he is, his personal freedom and his innocence would quickly come to an end. He would be scooped up and become the center of a weapons program to end all weapons programs.

So being that smart, he would never let anyone know that he was anything other than average.

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  • $\begingroup$ The counterpoint to this is that being smart was a good way to dodge the draft or manipulate the outcome of the war. If he is that smart he might choose to sacrifice his own personal freedoms to avoid the front-line or to build a nuke ahead of schedule saving millions of lives. These are matters of personal ethics and values which are independent factors from his intelligence. $\endgroup$
    – Nosajimiki
    Dec 22 '19 at 6:04

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