1
$\begingroup$

EDIT: Due to request I will turn this question into a series of questions.

I'm wanting to make a character with the power to change the value of mass for objects. Before anyone answers let me make some clarifications.

The person does not CHANGE THE AMOUNT OF MATTER in an object, or alter its density or volume, the character literally make the same individual particle have a mass of 2 instead of 1. An analogy is if you had a bag of marbles, and each marble had a number on them, rather then changing the amount of marbles in the bag you change the number on the marbles. (I have heard that in particle physics mass can be seen as an intrinsic quality and in the case of Hawking's radiation there is "negative" mass to evaporate black holes.)

Edit: For those saying the number isn't arbitrary, for arguments sake this person's has the ability to make it arbitrary. I know this is pseudo science. I just want to know what should happen realistic after the unrealistic of changing the mass.

So my question is literally what can and can't this character do. I'll give one question for this thread.

  • If an Object at the center had its mass decreased but on the outside layer had its mass increased? Would the negative and positive mass cancel each other out for a net mass of 0 making the object light enough to carry. (Even if it's a large object like a car or piece of large furniture.) If you hit someone with this object would the person not feel any mass (0 mass) based off the total net mass of negative and positive mass or would they feel the outside layer of "positive mass" so the person holding the object could effectively be holding an object that weighs nothing but hits like a truck when slammed against objects?

Also No Making Guesses if you don't have an educated opinion. (Like me I don't have an educated opinion) Refrain from answering. Your answer must have a source to an experiment, paper, or whatever to back up your Educated guesses, hypotheses, or theories. Although the answer itself would be best if he could explain it to a lay person, as long as you have the more technical explanation to back it up I'll accept that.

$\endgroup$

closed as too broad by Hohmannfan, Aify, Frostfyre, Brythan, Separatrix Jul 10 '16 at 7:01

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 4
    $\begingroup$ Hello and welcome to the forum. This is a very interesting question. Actually, these are interesting questions. Could you chop your question into separate pieces? Pretty much each of your dots is worth a question in itself! $\endgroup$ – PatJ Jul 10 '16 at 1:23
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ The person does not change the amount of matter in an object, or alter it's density or volume, By increasing the mass in a given volume, you are going to increase the density anyway. $\endgroup$ – Andrew Recard Jul 10 '16 at 2:14
  • $\begingroup$ What is your particle described? Molecules? Atoms? Quarks? Cells? Please explain. $\endgroup$ – zzz Jul 10 '16 at 2:15
  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to the site. While you seem to have tried to explain this super power, I have to admit that it makes no sense to me as described. Mass is matter, so how can you change the mass of something without changing the amount of matter in it? $\endgroup$ – Frostfyre Jul 10 '16 at 3:45
  • $\begingroup$ @Frosfyre I think the person changes the atomic mass possibly. They could make a new isotope and then use magic to keep it stable. Although then rebuked point about electrostatic force wouldn't make sense. $\endgroup$ – Bellerophon Jul 10 '16 at 9:09
3
$\begingroup$
  • If the individual particles have their mass increased does the gravitational force scale with it?

Yes, the gravitational force is dependent on mass, and will increase with denser (mass/volume) objects. Unless your character can affect mass values without restraint, he probably wont make objects heavy enough to have their own noticeable gravitational field (and if he did, wouldn't be good for the Earth).

  • If something was given negative or zero mass, would that object cease to exist? Or at least be unable to be interacted with for all intents and purposes.

We don't really know. 'Negative mass' is part of theoretical physics. Perhaps it would produce antigravity? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Negative_mass As for zero mass objects, they would essentially be weightless and have no gravitational field. They would travel at the speed of light.

  • If the value of mass was increase for individual particles would it eventually become too much of a burden for the electromagnetic force holding the molecule's together or even the nuclear force holding the atoms themselves together?

No. At these scales the forces that hold them together are a lot stronger than the weights of the particles, which are then dependent on the gravity. The reason why large atoms fall apart is due to too much electrostatic repulsion, not because the atom is actually heavy. So no, changing the weight of fundamental particles would not result in some breakdown.

  • If the value of mass changed what effects would it have on other values like charge, etc?

None. These values are pretty much independent of eachother. We dont know why they even exist.

  • If an Object at the center had it's mass decreased but on the outside layer had it's mass increased? Would the negative and positive mass cancel each other out for a net mass of 0 making the object light enough to carry. (Even if it's a large object like a car or piece of large furniture.) If you hit someone with this object would the person not feel any mass (0 mass) based off the total net mass of negative and positive mass or would they feel the outside layer of "positive mass" so the person holding the object could effectively be holding an object that weighs nothing but hit's like a truck when slammed against objects?

They would feel the mass hit them, but again, we dont know the true properties of negative mass. The object would be destroyed for all we know.

  • Would the durability of an object scale up or down or remain the same with a mass change. (Ergo if a large object becomes light as a feather would it's durability scale so that if you grabbed it to lift it the pressure from your fingers would puncture it like what should happen when people with super strength lift most large objects in fiction.

No, it wouldnt. Durability depends on the bonds between atoms in the material, not the mass of the object. Gold is more massive than titanium, but titanium is more durable.

  • If this person turned himself into negative mass or zero mass. (His entire person including the electric pulses in his nervous system.) Could he make at the speed of light(0 mass) or faster then light(negative mass) I've often heard that some people think that if you could have negative mass you could move faster then light. Would changing the mass value of an entire functioning human body have any negative effects of it's functioning?

Again, we have no idea whether negative mass is even possible. Zero mass would have you travelling at the speed of light however, but that will result in time not moving for the person, so they would probably end up dead by collision.

  • If this person created a localized area of negative mass, could it behave like a vacuum until enough positive mass filled the area to "neutralize it?" Could this person used a controlled intricate area/volume of negative and positive mass to control, distribute, negate, increase, or shift the change in force, pressure, or acceleration in a certain area?

Impossible to know. Only looking for educated answers in this area won't achieve much.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Please don't answer questions identifying many different points of interest. The question is likely to be put on hold as "too broad," resulting in only your answer being available for consideration. $\endgroup$ – Frostfyre Jul 10 '16 at 3:47
  • $\begingroup$ It's ok, I'm just trying to help. $\endgroup$ – Andrew Recard Jul 10 '16 at 5:09
  • $\begingroup$ So basically my question is so abstract and theoretical that there can be no "accurate" answer and is anyone's guess? On the durability thing, I think you answered my question with the Gravity section. I was thinking about the reverse square law, where at a certain size the structure wouldn't be supported by the weight. $\endgroup$ – dpolaristar Jul 10 '16 at 22:50

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.