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My previous/first post on here was to brainstorm a means of telekinesis and pyrokinesis (even if very limited) that violates physics the least. Now I do realize that a lot of handwaving and number-fudging will still be necessary, but I feel that the diamagnetic levitation approach at least sounds the most sound.

So how exactly might that work? Not how the brain would produce such a magnetic field, nor how the mage/psi would acquire the necessary energy, as those are my last and probably most-handwaved concerned. What kind of materials are diamagnetic? What other affects (damage, pain in living targets, etc) would the materials experience? How much energy does it take to produce a diamagnetic field and levitate objects with it?

Also, might other types of magnetism be applicable to my pseudoscientfic electromagnetic telekinesis approach? Such as ferromagnetism, the only other one I can name? I'm not looking for godlike furniture-flying-around telekinesis, more like "my limbs are all shackled, and I can unlock my restraints with my brainwaves in a pinch, but the requirements/consequences might almost be not worth it". And things like shackles are why I also asked about ferromagnetism.

May be good to inform y'all at this time that while I may write science-fantasy and not high fantasy, the setting itself is pretty low-tech. 1750s minus gunpowder at its best. So no nanotech or particle generators, and while the minds of the day have a fairly good understanding of how magic/psionics work, their terminology is much less technical than nowadays. Though the fantasy presentation is irrelevant to the somewhat-ish scientific mechanisms I seek.

Again, all the answers to my last post were absolutely lovely! Much better than any other science or writing forums I've tried! I just need some elaboration/collaboration on certain points to minimize the handwavium and preteen-esque math errors as much possible. Thanks for all help!

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Well, I'd start here with the Wikipedia article on diamagnetism, which also links to paramagnetism. Both effects are very weak, and you need to be able to create very powerful magnetic fields to do anything significant with them. They aren't "different kinds of magnetism" but different ways in which matter responds to magnetic fields.

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