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In the movie The Matrix, the remaining population of the world is kept within a computer system that simulates the real world. Very few people in that system are aware of that fact, with a relatively small resistance of people fighting to free everyone. One of the problems with spreading this knowledge is that most people would just dismiss it as false, while others (particularly those who are older and so ingrained in the system) would die from the shock of it all.

In a world like ours that exists today, a group of scientists discover irrefutable proof that it exists within a simulation. They are conflicted, as a few want to go public with this information, but others are convinced that the negative ramifications are too great and would serve no good. What follows is a discussion about what would become of such a world.

As part of the dialog, I want to consider:

  • What would be the best way to go about releasing this information in a trustworthy and reliable way?

EDIT: Specifically looking for convincing arguments for both sides to give on how the world might react, best case and worst case, should they go public.

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closed as too broad by Hohmannfan, clem steredenn, Avernium, Thucydides, Brythan Jul 6 '16 at 22:57

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ This is much too broad to answer properly. Typically, "How would the world react to X" covers society, government, economics, science and a whole range of areas that can't be coalesced into a single good answer. You might have better luck breaking them up into multiple questions. Your first sub-question in particular could stand on its own. $\endgroup$ – Avernium Jul 6 '16 at 20:34
  • $\begingroup$ You have multiple questions in one, and the answer to your second and third questions will depend on the choice made in the first. It would be better to ask the first and then follow up with another question or questions. $\endgroup$ – Brythan Jul 6 '16 at 22:57
  • $\begingroup$ See worldbuilding.stackexchange.com/questions/tagged/… $\endgroup$ – Vincent Jul 7 '16 at 2:42
  • $\begingroup$ For some reason when I searched before I asked this, I missed that there were some similar questions that cover some of the different parts I was looking for. I'll reduce it to the first question then. $\endgroup$ – Mwr247 Jul 7 '16 at 14:56
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Disbelief mostly, otherwise no significant change.

A majority of people believe what they want and what makes them comfortable, and people don't like uncomfortable truths. Additionally, the majority of people simply wouldn't understand, making them incapable of believing.

There's no single best way to release the information. It depends on the motivation of the people releasing the information. What does the public have to gain by knowing they're in a simulation? How can you "dumb down" this evidence so that anyone can understand it? How can the average person convince themselves it's true?

The reaction of the governments is to find a way to control the information. Maintaining control and peace. Likely attempting to exploiting whatever flaw in the system that proves it's a simulation, using those flaws to manipulate events, gather information that would be otherwise unobtainable, etc.

If people were willing to accept it, I think the majority would continue on with life as it is. Afterall, a majority of people in the world already believe everything they do, say, or feel is being observed by a big man in the sky. They already believe that this life is just a temporary existence followed by an eternity of one kind or another. New religions would begin worshiping "the creators" or "simulators", whatever it may be.

As for the way out, like I said, most people already believe there's a "way out" of this life, and everyone is going to get there eventually anyway.

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People don't trust in evidence, logic or science, as the answer above said people literally choose the most comfortable lie to believe.

In a world where 70% of the world chooses to believe and not to understand, telling people they are simulation would have no effects at all.

Because those who believe in lies always dominate.

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