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In my world, magic is a gaseous element. Similar to how when particles in water condense to form ice, magic condenses to form or manipulate the world. Likewise how particles expand in water to evaporate, magic particles can expand to become largely unusable by mages.

Now for my world, outside of manipulation by mages I want a technological anti-magic and was wanting it to be electricity. Electricity will cause magical particles to expand and condense along the edges of its effected radius. Also magic can be put into its own form of circuits to do complex tasks.

So my question is what could I do with electricity to counter magic as well as work together with it? Could I combine an electric circuit with a magic one?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Aify, Green, Frostfyre, Hohmannfan, Xandar The Zenon Jun 23 '16 at 2:48

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ Have you considered the effect of a lightning strike? How about static electricity in general? $\endgroup$ – WhatRoughBeast Jun 22 '16 at 14:52
  • $\begingroup$ @WhatRoughBeast I have thought lightning before. As for static electricity, I don't really know alot about electricity, but after your comment I'm going to say that minor static would cause minor disturbances. Say enough to shock someone, would have a minor effect that would briefly cause the magic to dissipate slightly but as long as it's not continous would go back to normal. $\endgroup$ – Devin Jun 22 '16 at 15:05
  • $\begingroup$ Going back to water analogy. A static shock would be like a rock dropped into water. There would be noticeable difference but it would go back to normal fairly quickly. $\endgroup$ – Devin Jun 22 '16 at 15:07
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    $\begingroup$ That would be a more specific question. The answer would "You can do whatever you want" since your theory of magic is not clearly defined. $\endgroup$ – PCSgtL Jun 22 '16 at 15:26
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    $\begingroup$ Your world is just the opposite of Hogwarts. Food for thought, you may get some ideas by reading that question and its answers. $\endgroup$ – Renan Jun 22 '16 at 16:47
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Slight clarification, it is likely the magnetic field of electricity that influences magic. Not the electricity itself. So doing a little review on how magnetic fields work might be useful.

Things to consider

Polarity, some fields can attract magic, some can repel. (Does magic have a polarity as well?)

Compressed magic? You could use magnetic fields to manipulate magic like they do plasma in fusion reactors.

Fast magic? You could speed up a small stream of magic like CERN.

Other magnetic principles? Could you magnetize a suit of iron armor and then use it to repel magic?

Electricity is the flow of electrons from one atom to another. If you want to create a science to this all, you might want to turn your magic gas into a special element (Ma), and when it produces ions it becomes magical, or alternatively it’s atoms are made up of unique particles. The electron equivalent (alectron? Malectron?) flow along wires of Ma to create magic.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you :) you have given me some things to consider and I like the magnetism train of thought. Magic could possibly interact with the planets magnetic field or react to solar wind which I like. $\endgroup$ – Devin Jun 22 '16 at 15:31
  • $\begingroup$ Do be careful with what gets explained. Most can agree Mitocloriens (sp?) did nothing good for Star Wars. $\endgroup$ – PCSgtL Jun 22 '16 at 15:37
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    $\begingroup$ @Devin along with be careful with what gets explained, it might be helpful to look up Sanderson's Laws of Magic, which are good general purpose guidelines when making magic systems. The gist is that it's often good to leave things vague, emphasize the limitations, and be careful when expanding on the magic system. $\endgroup$ – AndyD273 Jun 22 '16 at 16:11

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