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Would scientists on the other side of blast survive in a bunker? I got an alien using telekinesis abilities to move Moon with the speed of " 1 hour till collide from the moment Moon left the orbit". So how devastating the effect will be?

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  • $\begingroup$ I read some time ago that the impact between Theia and a Mars-sized planet, from which the Earth and the Moon arised, had a relative velocity between both bodies of around four kilometers per second. That's pretty close to Mach 3 in our atmosphere. That's orders of magnitude slower than the figures in Michael's answer and it still obliterared two planets completely, due to the sheer amount of mass invoved. Maybe you'd like to crash Phobos or Deimos on Mars instead? $\endgroup$ – Renan Jun 19 '16 at 13:07
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    $\begingroup$ Read this: what-if.xkcd.com/20 $\endgroup$ – Thucydides Jun 19 '16 at 15:55
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Mars is a long distance away.

Also Mars is only twice the diameter of the Moon, and the moon is 1/9 the mass of Mars.

To move from Earth orbit to Mars in 1 hour, you need an average speed at least 73 million kilometers per hour, which is about 7% of the speed of light.

Calculating the pure kinetic energy of the Moon as it smacks into Mars, it comes down to approximately 30 x 1036 Joule (not counting relativistic effects). The Sun outputs 3.6 x 1026 Joule each second. So in that moment of collision, let us say it takes 1 second... this Moon-Mars system outputs the energy of 100 billion Suns.

Since the Earth is approximately the same distance from the Sun as from Mars — even a little bit closer — this means that when the shockwave of energy from this collision reaches Earth... the side of Earth that is facing Mars is instantly roasted to crisps.

Would you at this point chance that someone on a bunker on Mars, at the very epicenter of this 100 billion suns release of energy, will have any chance to survive; in a place where the surface of the Sun is — in comparison — freezing cold?

Short answer: No, not a chance... they will be blasted into elementary particles.

How devastating will the effects be? You obliterate the Moon and Mars into elementary particles... you vaporize half the surface of the Earth in the process... you make ripples on the surfaces of the Sun, Jupiter and Saturn.

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    $\begingroup$ Well hopefully aliens already snatched the planet Earth to another galaxy. :) $\endgroup$ – undulationer Jun 19 '16 at 11:56
  • $\begingroup$ Will the blast reach the moon of Jupiter- Calisto? Thanks for swift answer. $\endgroup$ – undulationer Jun 19 '16 at 12:06
  • $\begingroup$ @UnduLationer Yes of course it will. I say again: 100 billion Suns concentrated on a (relatively speaking) very tiny area. $\endgroup$ – MichaelK Jun 19 '16 at 12:08
  • $\begingroup$ @UnduLationer And here is the fun part of course: how did these "telepathic abilities" impart energy of the equivalent amount of 3 000 years worth of output from our Sun on the Moon? Where were these aliens storing that energy? Using E = MC^2 (the mass-energy equivalence) that amount of energy is 300 million billion tons of mass. That is one huge telepathic alien... $\endgroup$ – MichaelK Jun 19 '16 at 12:18
  • $\begingroup$ Ok, how many days it's acceptable for Moon to travel and smack the Mars, so the blast won't affect Calisto? That alien is just extremely powerful, its tool for such power is telekinesis, not telepathic. My bad. I got a scientific base there, I don't want it to be destroyed... $\endgroup$ – undulationer Jun 19 '16 at 13:03

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