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If Earth would have been sucked into black hole.

Would it be crushed by gravity pressure or not?

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    $\begingroup$ This would probably do far better on the physics stack exchange site. Without providing any references, though, it would be crushed. (My degree was in physics, but it's been a LONG time since I've touched it...) $\endgroup$ – Ghotir Jun 3 '16 at 17:53
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    $\begingroup$ I think it would break up before being sucked in, as the gravity increases the closer you get to the event horizon, and so the side closest to the EH would be pulled harder than the far side. This is called Spaghettification. $\endgroup$ – AndyD273 Jun 3 '16 at 18:02
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    $\begingroup$ @Dr.Sheldon-Memer It doesn't actually matter if the BH is moving toward the Earth, or if the Earth is moving toward the BH. Spaghettification will stretch it out like a rubber band, which would most likely cause the Earth to break up. Tidal forces would indeed crush everything about a 10th of a second before hitting the singularity. Here's a fun video on the subject of falling into a black hole. $\endgroup$ – AndyD273 Jun 3 '16 at 18:20
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    $\begingroup$ I should mention that my previous comment mostly applies if the BH EH is larger than the Earth. Depending on velocity and mass, a smaller black hole would either go in one side, and other the other, and out of the solar system without slowing down much, or it would get caught by the Earths gravity and could possibly even orbit inside of the Earths crust as it eats the Earth from the inside out, until either the BH evaporates or the Earth loses enough mass that it can't hold the BH any more. Worst case, the BH comes to rest at the core, eating the earth, until the moon is just orbiting the BH. $\endgroup$ – AndyD273 Jun 3 '16 at 18:30
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    $\begingroup$ This question is more fit for physics.stackexchange.com. $\endgroup$ – Renan Jun 3 '16 at 21:24
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Simple logic tells use that an object with infinitely large density ei; a black hole, has an infinitely large gravity. thus the earth would be crushed.

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  • $\begingroup$ Finally,ok it would be crushed thank you for your answer :D $\endgroup$ – Confused Tom Jun 3 '16 at 18:13
  • $\begingroup$ @Dr.Sheldon-Memer Ofcourse size is important, Even with Infinite gravity, Blackholes only have it within the Event horizon which is determined primarily based on their mass. Without enough of it, the damage done will be next to nothing. But with enough of it, even a tiny black hole may be big enough to consume the entire planet given some time. $\endgroup$ – Ryan Jun 3 '16 at 18:18
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Neither, the earth would probably be well within the Roche limit long before it 'enters' the black hole's event horizon, getting pulled to shreds long before by the tidal effects.

If it did enter the black hole's event horizon it'd undergo 'spaghettification'. Look it up, it's fun.

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