3
$\begingroup$

Does anyone know of a SciFi "Universe" where humans have expanded across hundreds/thousands of stellar systems, but the empire has collapsed? Furthermore, the human occupied worlds fall to various levels of technology? Where most don't know what caused the collapse, and some aren't even aware of their past? Some people still have interstellar travel, but some that do don't understand how it works. Some have interplanetary travel and some have fallen to a preindustrial level.

I know Isaac Asimov's Foundation series is somewhat similar. I've been ruminating/developing a scifi universe that could be used for both rpg and writing purposes, and I thought "this has to have been done before". My sister told me it sounds similar to the tv series Andromeda, but after reading about that series, it doesn't sound quite like what I'm thinking of. Somewhat similar, but not exactly. But I've never really watched that show.


Edit

Requirements: 1. A far future human stellar empire(federation, hegemony, whatever). 2. It collapses and fragments. 3. At least 100-200 years pass. 4. The remnants are left at varying tech levels. 5. (Bonus) Some remnants have lost their history.

I want to create this "universe" as a story telling vehicle that could also be used as a game playing setting. I've given it some thought over the last few years, but I've become hung up by the fear that my idea is probably not very original, or just too close to someone else's. So, I'm trying to find out if anyone else has used a "universe" that matches almost all of those requirements.

But does it really matter if others have? I'll read up on everyone's suggestions. Thank You in advance!

$\endgroup$

closed as off-topic by Xandar The Zenon, James, Hohmannfan, JDSweetBeat, Green May 18 '16 at 19:29

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question does not appear to be about worldbuilding, within the scope defined in the help center." – Xandar The Zenon, James, Hohmannfan, JDSweetBeat, Green
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ Isn't this like, the entire plot of one of Asimov's book series? I haven't read it, but I feel like I've heard of it. $\endgroup$ – Xandar The Zenon May 18 '16 at 4:59
  • $\begingroup$ While David Weber's Empire From The Ashes trilogy is not perfect fit, it does have one huge highly advanced fallen empire. Also, I really like it. $\endgroup$ – Euphoric May 18 '16 at 6:19
  • $\begingroup$ I dont remember details on setting, but have a look at fading suns rpg $\endgroup$ – user902383 May 18 '16 at 11:23
  • $\begingroup$ @Euphoric I haven't read any of the Empire From The Ashes books, but I think I have one of them. I'll look into it. Thank You. $\endgroup$ – Terry Wendt May 18 '16 at 14:13
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I am not sure what the rules are on SciFi but I would say this isn't quite a fit for world building (its a good question) but I don't know that we cover suggestions for comparison...I know we do resources requests (books, sites etc) but generally only about world building... $\endgroup$ – James May 18 '16 at 15:29
1
$\begingroup$

H. Beam Piper's Terro-Human Future History is another possibility, with at least 2 Federations and 5 Empires.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks @WhatRoughBeast This really does tick off most of the boxes on my list. Now I really want to read his books! $\endgroup$ – Terry Wendt May 18 '16 at 2:38
1
$\begingroup$

The most glaring example I know of is the CoDominium series by Jerry Pournelle.

Strictly speaking not all of this is about a collapsed galactic empire; it begins with the first waves of colonization. With the Falkenberg subseries, it describes as it begins to collapse and how a military leader begins building his own, new Empire.

Later books in the series (like The Mote in God's Eye) are placed after the second empire has become more or less consolidated but there are references to the fighting and loss of technologies due to the fall of the first empire.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks @SJuan76, this has some of the ideas I was looking for, but I can rule it out because it doesn't really match enough.. I'm trying to rule out other people's settings. $\endgroup$ – Terry Wendt May 18 '16 at 2:27
0
$\begingroup$

Lois McMaster Bujold: Shards of Honor (1986), Barrayar (1991), other stories. Humanity settled many planets using wormhole tech, then lost the ability (or lost track of some of the wormholes IDK), then regained the ability and re-connected some of the previously isolated worlds.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for bringing Lois McMaster Bujold back to my attention! I've only read her first novel - Falling Free(1988). I'll have to see if my local library has any more or if they can get them on loan. I was really looking for any "universes" that checked more if not all of the boxes. I'll have to edit my original post and be more concise. $\endgroup$ – Terry Wendt May 18 '16 at 0:53
0
$\begingroup$

I know this is an RPG world, but I think it suits the question. The RPG world of "Diaspora" has some degree of this, except, in Diaspora, Empires and Federations and the like have risen and fallen so many times, no one really remembers where it all started. It's tens of thousands of years into the future.

Some civilizations are very advanced, while others are as far back as the stone age. The one thing is, that the way the universe is setup, there are only a dozen star systems or so connected by wormholes called "Slipstreams". Not sure if that's what you had in mind, but I think it might fit your needs.

http://www.vsca.ca/Diaspora/

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks @Brubek Coltrane Yeah, the setting as you describe it matches most of the components of my idea. Now to decide if my ideas are different enough to pursue... $\endgroup$ – Terry Wendt May 18 '16 at 3:11
0
$\begingroup$

Another example is the Asgard's empire in Stargate SG-1. Even if they are not human, one of their member indicate they were not so far from human in term of genetics until they discover cloning. They end up suiciding, after being attacked by Replicators, because they would have been dead anyway due to the cloning losing performance in term of efficiency. Some Asgardian did survive, since we see them in Stargate Atlantis (but they were in exil since a long time), and they solved the problem of the mutation. The 100-200 years didn't pass, but that might give you some ideas.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for responding @Gautier C I'm not really sure the tale of the Asgards meet any of the criteria I was looking for. But their situation does have some similarities. $\endgroup$ – Terry Wendt May 18 '16 at 16:47

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.