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In Star Wars there is something known as "the force" that exists everywhere and can be used to do things such as move objects from a distance and to try to extract information from people's minds. How might "the force" work if it was something that was actually real?

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    $\begingroup$ Midichlorians... $\endgroup$ – J_F_B_M May 4 '16 at 13:06
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A simple explanation would be that it's a personal "bioelectric force field" (an explanation often used for Superman's powers) which is controlled by force of will, or something that works similar to the Tractor Beams used in Star Wars. Not that the tractor beams are really explained, but assuming a machine can do it, a sufficiently complex organism should be able to perform the task as well.

That being said, there is the issue of a power supply. Human bodies don't really intake enough food to produce the sort of energy required to push a spaceship, "bioelectric field" or not. Even Superman being bathed in sunlight all day wouldn't be able to explain many of his feats. Not that writers ever really worry about conservation of energy.

Or hey, you can take the Midi-chlorians route, and remind Star Wars fans about how their dreams were murdered.

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The existence of a similar energy is described by many old religions/texts as a sort of transient multidimensional life energy that is present in all things. As an example, in the old Vedic religions, it was believed that the universe is hologram in the sense that every individual organism is an expression of the totality of existence (you've no doubt heard this one somewhere before.. "So God created mankind in his own image.." Genesis 1:27).

So let's assume that this is all true and that, since "we are all a means through which the universe becomes conscious of itself" (yogis and gurus say this all the time), then we are the universe and therefore able to control it in the same way we control our bodies depending on how high we are able to raise our awareness of reality.

Interestingly, it is often said that the ultimate aim of yoga is to raise consciousness to the point where the individual is one with the universe and able to leave his/her body willingly.

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