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So, as part of a fictional setting, I sent asteroid 1999 FN53 (which is 900 metres in diameter) on a collision course with Earth as part of a terrorist attack, at a speed of 150 km/s, at an angle of 57 degrees. It crashes 2 km west off the coast of Guam. If 3.04 teratonnes worth of TNT are released and Earth has 13 billion humans by the time this happens, is it extinction-level?

EDIT: Actually, regarding the situation on population sustainability, I went with the recent version of the UN medium estimate of 11.2 billion by 2100 and assumed a growth rate of 0.04% over 300 years. So....there. :/ Also, that asteroid was accerated to that speed at the approach upon Earth, and the initial acceleration aftr it was moved was 30 km/s, with its pre-change speed being 14 km/s. So, there. A few gpod explanations, and the method was to construct 5 large mass drivers and use the asteroid itself as propellant.:/

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  • $\begingroup$ My comment is not related to space exploration at all, but many estimate a population of 10 billion to be the current maximum capacity of Earth. Do you address how Earth manages to exceed this? $\endgroup$ – called2voyage Apr 13 '16 at 19:45
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    $\begingroup$ I am a little puzzled about that 150 km/s number, even if it hit Earth head-on in its orbit, and accelerates a down our gravity wheel, it still have an initial orbital velocity of about 3x solar system escape velocity. $\endgroup$ – SE - stop firing the good guys Apr 13 '16 at 19:52
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    $\begingroup$ Going from the energy of the blast to whether it would be an extinction event is a gigantic leap. This looks like it came from this calculator. So, there is almost no research behind this question. You've said in chat that you want to realistically depict this as a science fiction work. Then, you have to do your research. When someone is seriously doing research they begin to ask focused questions that display a lot of background knowledge. This is the opposite. If you don't want to do research, make up a story, have fun, and don't worry about it. $\endgroup$ – kim holder Apr 13 '16 at 21:00
  • $\begingroup$ sighw @kimholder Any ideas, then? $\endgroup$ – Future Historian Apr 13 '16 at 21:16
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    $\begingroup$ I have seen quite some discussion about "inverse duplicates" before, but this seems like an appropriate scenario. $\endgroup$ – SE - stop firing the good guys Apr 15 '16 at 8:19
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The KT Extinction 65 million years ago was caused by about 100 teratonnes of explosive force. 3% of an apocalypse still sounds pretty apocalyptic to me.

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