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I was thinking of a situation in which a life form evolves a biological screen somewhere on its body that can play videos. The life form would play videos on its biological video screen in order to share ideas and memories with other members of its species. The videos that the life form could play could be simulations of what has happened or could happen in the real world or they could be simulations of entirely fictional worlds.

How would a biological video screen work? What kind of selective pressure could cause a species to evolve to have a biological video screen?

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Yes,it could happen. But that means the animal would also need very good eyesight to pick up these signals-else they are useless

fish

Deep sea animals have been doing this for a long time now.

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    $\begingroup$ My day is always better when someone asks a question about some fanciful creature design, wondering how it might evolve, and the answer comes back "yeah, we already do it." $\endgroup$ – Cort Ammon Feb 7 '16 at 19:35
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    $\begingroup$ @CortAmmon I think my all time favorite answer I ever wrote was for an anatomically correct land shark. Goes right with "yeah, we already do it." $\endgroup$ – Xandar The Zenon Feb 8 '16 at 0:09
  • $\begingroup$ Evolution can bring about better eye sight/better displays as a society desired trait, much as people/animals put up a display of eye catching parts of their body/abilities for various social exchanges. "Simpsons did it"... $\endgroup$ – Nahshon paz Feb 8 '16 at 12:24
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A good starting point would be the chromatophores of the cuttlefish which have an amazing range of colors and textures, and can vary at Hz rates. One would assume that sexual displays would form the basis for more abstract forms of communications.

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I always figured that cows could be engineered to have chromataphore skin inspired by cephalapods, to be used for advertising.

But lab rats used at prototypes could learn to use it as active camouflage and escape: maybe the cephalapod genes also boosted their intelligence more than intended. After all, it requires processing power to control the display surface.

They would then breed with wild rats which are more genetically varied, and cause all sorts of things to happen with the unplanned interaction between genes.

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    $\begingroup$ Bovine billboard. Just made my day. $\endgroup$ – Joe Bloggs Feb 8 '16 at 10:57

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