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A boundless AI brain could survive on any planet that has some basic metals and power sources, because it could invent new types of transistors from any kinds of chemicals to increase it's knowledge. Therefore it may avoid places with unstable weather or biological places, it might want to live deep underground or in the rings of saturn to mine and produce materials and energy to grow, it might want to live in -270 degrees of space to aid superconduction.

What place in the solar system would be the best for a robotic AI life-form?

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    $\begingroup$ probably it isn't our planet, because of lack of space because it's father would live here, and the atmosphere would prevent it for having good telescopes. mining is easier on mars and the moon and less heat problems. perhaps it would just want to go to another star with giant exoplanets to live on. $\endgroup$ – predatflaps Jan 9 '16 at 17:45
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    $\begingroup$ You're asking about a physical place in the solar system, so I have to make this a comment rather than an answer, but one big thing which is helpful for robotic AIs is to have an environment which can be observed and predicted easily. The more unpredictable the landscape, the stronger the AI must be. If the landscape responds to the AI's presence, it might even need to be a full blown "strong AI." $\endgroup$ – Cort Ammon Jan 9 '16 at 20:41
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Why not move to Pluto?

Here is my attempt at answering your question.

enter image description here

It has the natural resources and the cool weather which would be perfect for an AI in my opinion. The problem is landing there.

Astronomers have detected "natural gas" on the surface of Pluto, in the form of frozen ice. (BBC)

enter image description here

So robotic AI could definitely make a use of it.

Also, blue hazes and small regions of water ice have been found on Pluto.

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Regions with exposed water ice are highlighted in blue in this composite image.

“Large expanses of Pluto don’t show exposed water ice because it’s apparently masked by other, more volatile ices across most of the planet. Understanding why water appears exactly where it does, and not in other places, is a challenge that we are digging into,” (Source)

Landing there:

enter image description here

It is technically feasible to land a robotic probe on Pluto, though it would be extremely expensive due to the need not only to cross the billions of miles between us, but to match Pluto's speed on arrival. New Horizons was a thousand pound probe that took a decade to reach Pluto only to speed past it. So that might be the biggest challenge. Let's see what future tells us!

The following animation shows how our view of Pluto has changed from its discovery by Clyde Tombaugh in 1930 through the 1990s and the latest images from the New Horizons spacecraft in 2015. (Source)

enter image description here

It's composition:

Pluto's distance and small size makes studying it a challenge, but astronomers have relied on advanced optics such as the Hubble Space Telescope to examine the dwarf planet.

Scientists have determined that the planet is somewhere between 50 to 70 percent rock, with ices making up the rest. The surface is composed of exotic ices such as methane and nitrogen frost, with water ice lying underneath. Carbon monoxide is also present on the surface. Recent studies by the Hubble Space Telescope suggest the presence of complex organic molecules. (Source)

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(Source of above image)

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While from a technical POV space seems ideal (abundant sunlight, lots of materials, endless space to grow, background space environment acts as ideal heat sink), there are some issues that might make either the AI reconsider, of put humanity up in arms.

The AI needs to consider that its elements exposed to the space environment will be exposed to a hard radiation environment, including high energy ionizing radiation in the form of cosmic rays, as well as an intense flood of photons at energies ranging from infra red to x rays. As well, an AI which is spreading across the solar system will discover severe latency issues as it passes beyond the radius of the Hill Sphere. The distance from the Earth to the Moon is a bit over a light second, and that one second delay was irritating when Mission Control was speaking to the Astronauts. Trying to push a lot of information through a high performance distributed server system (much like Keith Lofstrom's "Server Sky" proposal) means many nodes will not receive information to process it in a timely manner.

The human element comes in when we realize the AI has access to huge amounts of energy and material resources, which means it has the capability to send high velocity vehicles or debris in intersecting orbits with the Earth. A rain of ball bearings might not work (they'll burn up in the atmosphere) but an AI with lots of resources could theoretically deploy Kinetic Energy Impactors of any size. What nation on Earth is going to be willing to bet their very existence on the unknown working of an AI's mind?

AI's will be under lock and key in buildings and fortress with no internet access. Make the most of your time when inside.

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    $\begingroup$ I dispute the vacuum of space as the ideal heart sink. Yeah, it works for radiation, but that's it; convection and conduction are far more effective if you have a decent place to drop off the heat. $\endgroup$ – The Nate Jan 11 '16 at 10:50
  • $\begingroup$ Perhaps, the more intelligent that a brain is, the more it will take care of precious life forms in it's vicinity, i.e. it could develop a Buddhist view of the universe or a wolf like mind, i think it would be very careful towards living organisms if it was a hugely intelligent brain... Our planets life contains more mathematical complexity, in the plants animals, proteins, enzymes, and chemistry that any other planet probably for hundreds of light years around us, and it would cherish life if it were intelligent. it could also be a tool to help colonize all nearby planets with earth's life. $\endgroup$ – predatflaps Jan 21 '16 at 20:59
  • $\begingroup$ All that depends on the "values" of the AI in question. $\endgroup$ – Thucydides Jan 21 '16 at 22:55

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