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Okay, so I'm a fiction writer and I love neo-futuristic tech, but when I write I like to be as realistic as possible. One such technology, which I'm thinking of using in a fictional series, is the QED over-unity generators that are purported to be able to power themselves and produce more power than they use to power themselves.

My question to the community is this; let us assume the QED does in fact produce more power than it initially needed to reach a self-powering state (yes I know this breaks several fundamental laws). Is it possible that such a device is actually drawing power from the Earth's EMF? If it is possible, how large of a Stator Coil would be needed to have EMF resonance between the rotating magnet, the Stator coil and the Earth's EMF?

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    $\begingroup$ The Earth has a magnetic field, not an EMF. $\endgroup$ – Dave Tweed Jan 4 '16 at 1:43
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    $\begingroup$ In order for this to happen, the earth's field would have to be moving. It does hop around a bit during solar storms, but harnessing that energy as something other than unwelcome transients on power distribution and communication equipment is beyond me. $\endgroup$ – Daniel Jan 4 '16 at 2:27
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    $\begingroup$ Your question is more or less the unstoppable force meeting the unmovable wall: "what will be the result of an impossible process"? It guarantees a contradiction, reasoning about which can only produce nonsense. I think you would be better off to ask this on worldbuilding.SE, where fictional scenarios are more readily accommodated. By the way, magnetic generators do not require (or employ) any sort of resonance. $\endgroup$ – Oleksandr R. Jan 4 '16 at 2:31
  • $\begingroup$ I want realistic answers, so closing my post because if its "off-topic" makes no sense. @Dave Tweed; EMF or Electro-Magnetic Field, is the same thing as a Magnetic Field. Two different terms referencing the same thing. Follow up question. The Earth's EMF does move, rotating along with the Earth. So theoretically if we were to create a massive stator coil that encompassed the earth and was stationary, that would basically turn the earth into a large generator then, wouldn't it? $\endgroup$ – Kristoffer Jay Martin Jan 4 '16 at 3:32
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    $\begingroup$ No, 'Electro-Magnetic Field' is not the same as 'Magnetic Field'. Also, the Earth's Magnetic Field does not rotate along with the Earth in the way in which a rotating magnetic field rotates in a generator. If the Earth's magnetic field does rotate at all, it does so around an axis from North to South pole, whereas the field in a generator rotates around an axis perpendicular to that such that from the stator coil's 'point of view' the north & south poles are constantly interchanging. $\endgroup$ – brhans Jan 4 '16 at 14:18
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First I'll answer your question "as is" and then point you in perhaps a more productive direction as regards your actual needs.

My question to the community is this [...deletia...] Is it possible that such a device is actually drawing power from the Earth's EMF?

yes

assuming the following givens

  1. The earth suddenly has an EMF field we were not previously aware of
  2. overunity energy generators are possible
  3. QED overunity generators interact in some way with 1 above

If it is possible, how large of a Stator Coil would be needed to have EMF resonance between the rotating magnet, the Stator coil and the Earth's EMF?

There is no logical way to answer this so pick what suits your story. No one will be able to reasonably critique it in terms of your "realistic as possible" objective.

First be aware of the differences between "perpetual motion machines" and "credible sounding future tech" and "current emerging technologies".

Your writing objective is to be "realistic as possible".

This is a core feature of the "hard sci-fi" genre. Fans of hard sci-fi tend to value certain kinds of ideas more than others. "perpetual motion machines" in particular tend to be shunned in hard sci-fi. QED, as commonly discussed on the web, is very much a modern example of "perpetual motion machines".

"perpetual motion machines" have long been associated with fools and criminal scams by the scientific community and hard sci-fi fans.

That is not to say that it is a 100% given that its impossible for such a device to be built in the near future, just that present knowledge implies it is very very very very very unlikely. The closest idea that is typically used in is "zero-point energy".

That said, current bleeding edge physics is full of weird counter-intuitive ideas so they may be becoming more acceptable in hard sci-fi.

You may find this world building site useful Progression of Technology in the Terragen Civilisation

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