6
$\begingroup$

I've a creature that can focus CO2 laser through the len of the unique eyeball as means of self defense mechanism via natural selection. Now using the same natural selection process how can such creature prevent the laser from overheating the eye? Kindly use magic sparingly else face the wrath of my creature, it likes to put on a cape which do little to lessen the build up of heat. As usual answer that enables the species to shoot laser the longest duration wins.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Are you worried about the emission of a laser beam heating things up? Or are you worried that lasers are traditionally not the most efficient device in the world, and you need to dissipate a large amount of waste heat? $\endgroup$ – Cort Ammon Nov 16 '15 at 6:15
  • $\begingroup$ @CortAmmon: the latter(the more energy is pump into the atoms the more it gets excited and stayed long enough to be hit by a photon which then emits 2 photon hence simulated emission comes from meaning the photons will bounch around the eyeball coated with good but not perfect mirror) $\endgroup$ – user6760 Nov 16 '15 at 6:39
3
$\begingroup$

The creature's eyes are completely transparent to infrared light.

Perhaps the creature can also see far into the infrared spectrum, thus eyes which are transparent in infrared light would be selected for. The CO2 laser is coherent light in the infrared spectrum (it can't be seen by humans), that light is not absorbed by the eyes, so no energy is absorbed, and the eyes don't heat up.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ can you explain clearer I thought heat is IR and you mentioned that CO2 laser is IR? sorry my background is art and music. $\endgroup$ – user6760 Nov 16 '15 at 3:49
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @user6760 Heat is the transfer of energy between objects, one way to transfer heat is via infrared radiation (this is IR light). Heat IR is not coherent and spreads in all directions. If you have a coherent beam of IR then you have a IR laser. One way to generate a coherent beam of IR is with a CO2 laser. So they are all the same thing. $\endgroup$ – Samuel Nov 16 '15 at 3:54
  • $\begingroup$ Wouldn't you also need a heat sink to take care of all the waste heat created by generating the laser? Creating a laser takes a lot of energy, and that means a lot of heat. The amount of heat that the lens might absorb from the beam is trivial compared to that. $\endgroup$ – AndyD273 Nov 16 '15 at 17:45
  • $\begingroup$ @AndyD273 Actually, it only means a lot if hear depending on inefficiently of the system. Besides, the creature is directing energy out of its eyes, that seems like a perfect way to get rid of excess energy. $\endgroup$ – Samuel Nov 16 '15 at 18:17
  • $\begingroup$ If you read the comments, the question was specifically about waste heat though. A CO2 laser like any other gas laser consumes power and delivers less power in its radiation at about 10 μm wavelength. The difference between input and output power is waste heat. The more output power, the more input power, and the more waste heat, so the bigger the cooling system that is needed. Any laser strong enough to do damage is going to need a LOT of input power. 100% of the power is not going into creating the beam. You need active cooling, and the eye itself is to small of a radiator. $\endgroup$ – AndyD273 Nov 16 '15 at 18:46
2
$\begingroup$

How about having large balloons around the eyes that contain some sort of liquid with low vaporization temperatures? The vapor can then be pumped through a biological equivalent of a condenser, and fed back to do more cooling work.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ super cooled hydrogen gas circulation not only cools it can also generate electrical current to excite the atoms, very nice! $\endgroup$ – user6760 Nov 16 '15 at 3:57
  • $\begingroup$ Nice, practical answer. One that's sure to work. $\endgroup$ – n00dles Nov 16 '15 at 13:03
  • $\begingroup$ I don't think you'd want to use hydrogen. Its boiling point is -252.9°C, which would be hard for a natural biological process to do anything with, and anything above the boiling point won't have the heat transfer qualities that you need. You might be better off looking for something that boils above body temperature, but below the max operating temperature of the laser, or keep it liquid and find another way to radiate the heat, like how liquid cooling in a computer works. This may help to find a liquid: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… $\endgroup$ – AndyD273 Nov 16 '15 at 17:56
  • $\begingroup$ I didn't intend to say that one should use liquid hydrogen (or any other similar gas) because the biological cost of maintaining such low temperatures is way too high, and thus biologically impossible as far as Earth-like evolutionary conditions are concerned. I was thinking more like freons or similar agents used in consumer-grade refrigeration. The liquid would be cooled by passing it through fins or plates on the creature's body, like the radiator grill on refrigerators. $\endgroup$ – LiveMynd Nov 16 '15 at 23:57
  • $\begingroup$ @AndyD273: oh I'm one who wants to use hydrogen mainly to lower the temperature of a superconducting magnetic organ just like particle accelerator inside my creature, i'm not familiar with such setup only watch documentary on LHC. $\endgroup$ – user6760 Nov 17 '15 at 0:49
2
$\begingroup$

Radiator Fins

Blood, lymph, or some other liquid is pumped around the ocular lasing organs to absorb waste heat and then through a radiator fin, where the heat is radiated off through the high surface area.

Weather and temperatures would have an affect on how much the laser could be used without maxing out the radiator efficiency.

It could also work similar to a bat wing, where it extends out when needed to provide a large surface area, and then folds up to conserve warmth when it's not.

It's liquid cooling for the eyes.

enter image description here enter image description here

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Spread out the heat over large surface area also I'll add on it can double up as solar panel anyway up vote for realistic. $\endgroup$ – user6760 Nov 17 '15 at 0:55
1
$\begingroup$

It generates many little lasers in it's lung,

wich is cooled by the air it breathes, (also, there is good oxygen supply in the lung at all times) and uses optical wave guides to bundle and transport them to the eyes, where they only pass transparent parts.

the creature

the creature

optical wave guides

optical wave guides

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.