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How would the classic fantasy trope of giant mushroom forests evolve? In an alternate, Earth-like reality, how would fungi grow into dense, lush 'forests'?

Mushrooms decompose things, so to have fruiting bodies so large, they'd need something extraordinarily large to be decomposing, right?

What benefits would it have, anyway? Living so close together, like a forest, wouldn't provide any benefits I think. Although, given some thought, maybe these giant fungi could symbiote with algae to make lichen? Maybe they could develop a concave cap shape to catch water, which could make competition with the other fungi, feed the lichen, and bring other organisms inside the water and make fertiliser for the fungus?

Additionally, they might need to develop strong, woody stems to hold themselves up. How would this work? Prototaxites is theorised to have stood over 7 metres tall! Would they need to worry about their stability? Would the wind blow them over?

And how would other organisms react to the environment? Could they eat the mushrooms maybe? How would it fit in an environment with trees as a competition?

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    $\begingroup$ One question per post, please, with enough details to make it answerable. $\endgroup$
    – L.Dutch
    Commented May 22 at 10:45
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    $\begingroup$ @L.Dutch The question being asked is "How would giant mushroom forests evolve?", and the other questions are my thought process, focus, elaboration, and clarification. I can edit the post so it only has one question mark if you'd like. Additionally, what details am I expected to put here? Would you like a species name? I've given Prototaxites which could be used as a base-point. A time period? I feel it is fair to assume from the time period of Prototaxites, given the context of the post. Or would you rather I make 10 different posts? Genuinely, I'd like to know. I apologise for any confusion. $\endgroup$
    – Aster
    Commented May 22 at 10:52
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    $\begingroup$ Define "the classic fantasy trope of giant mushroom forest". We are here to help you solve your problem, not to elucubrate on all the possible implementation which each author has made. $\endgroup$
    – L.Dutch
    Commented May 22 at 11:00
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    $\begingroup$ I’m voting to close this question because "how can X evolve?" is an ambiguous question that, at best, violates the help center's Book Rule (question is too broad) and at worst is opinion-based because we don't actually know that much about evolution. Not by a long shot. Are you really asking for a multi-million-year history of your world that results in giant mushrooms? Or are you simply asking how to rationalize the existence (not the history) of giant mushrooms? $\endgroup$
    – JBH
    Commented May 22 at 17:28
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    $\begingroup$ By the way, to support @L.Dutch's comment. Stack Exchange has a strict one-question-per-post requirement. It's literally a reason to close questions (Needs More Focus is defined as asking more than one question). You're asking at least eight questions. Please don't debate us on this. Edit your question to remove all the other questions as they have no bearing on the one you claim you want answered. Or expect your question to be closed for Needs More Focus. $\endgroup$
    – JBH
    Commented May 22 at 17:31

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Maybe the huge mushroom structures that we associate with the classic mushroom shape is only produced to shade the actual smaller spore producing structures from too much light. they grow tall and into a nearly solid canopy beneath which the most light is blocked out. They could also transport groundwater up trap water vapor and humidify the above ground environment. A whole ecosystem that lives in the environment below (and above) made possible only by the larger shrooms.

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Welcome to the wonderful world of hybrid biology. Take something simple- like a lichen https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lichen - its a fungi that brings along algae + cyanobacteria to produce sugar via photosynthesis. In bad times, it suckers the water from the algae, storing it away, to be revived in good times. It produces acidic by products, allowing it to etch a protected space into stone. If given enough time to evolve, it would all happen again. Some of the symbiotics would go cancerous- developing into plants. The fungi would again, go symbiotic with these plants, switching roles and so on and so forth. The shapes would be different, but the situational mold in which it is poured, would generate the same overall layout. So unless the external parameters wouldn't change.. its just earth allover, after a great extinction event. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_extinction_events

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