-2
$\begingroup$

I've been planing a story for a long time and I have everything ready except this, Does anyone have an ideas on how to achieve immortality (doesn't have to be super scientific but i would appreciate a brief 'biological' explanation)? I want the story to be about a knight who desperately wants to gain it and gets punished for it in the end, magic exist in his universe (for context)

$\endgroup$
8
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Worldbuilding is really about solving specific issues (eg. "is method X plausibly a method of immortality?") rather than brainstorming. Consider rephrasing your question around an idea you've already had, and whether it is plausible, or what problems it might have. $\endgroup$ Commented May 8 at 15:23
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ We're not a brainstorming site to help you generate ideas. What do you mean by a "biological explanation for immortality"? Are you sure that describing the intracacies of the mechanism by which your knight remains immortal is essential to the story? Does it make sense for your setting to have a biological understanding of fantastic phenomena? There are plenty of stories of immortality for a price that don't even describe the mechanism let alone make it plausible. What value does including this add to your story? $\endgroup$
    – sphennings
    Commented May 8 at 15:33
  • $\begingroup$ my story is abotu many more characters than him, i already organised their story and his story too but I've been thinking about this one aspect for a few weeks now and can't seem to figure out anything good. i came by this website on accident and if i have to be honest I'm not so sure how to properly use it, i don't mean to come off as a lazy writer I'm just geniunely stuck but i also understand if this platform is not suitable for this question, i could delite my post? $\endgroup$
    – finn
    Commented May 8 at 17:39
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Close/Down Voters: This is usually our kind of question (questions of the form, "I want X in my world, how can I rationalize that?") so I'm wondering why so many people are down voting or voting to close. This isn't like "what color should I make my car?"... Granted, "immortality" could use more definition (godlike immortality where one cannot be hurt or something more like the movie Death Becomes Her where damage cannot be cured but intelligence remains, or are we talking about zombies?) but remember, new user, people! $\endgroup$
    – JBH
    Commented May 8 at 18:09
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Admitting that there's magic in this universe, how much of an explanation does immortality really need? For example, would it help the story at all to get into the details of biochemistry? Does it even fit your setting to get scientific about this at all? So otherwise, why can't it just be magic and leave it at that? For instance, stories about the Holy Grail don't usually explain "how" it works. $\endgroup$ Commented May 8 at 18:15

1 Answer 1

1
$\begingroup$

Perhaps his Dna repair is improved, his telomeres lengthened? I may be incorrect, but I've read that errors in Dna replication are believed to be a major source of aging. Telomeres, meanwhile, are caps on the end of Dna that have little purpose code-wise, instead present because errors are most common at the tips. As you live, the Dna is copied, errors occur, telomeres shorten, and damage accumulates. Hopefully this helps.

$\endgroup$
5
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Also not a biologist, but I have read in some detail that telomeric decay is one of the key reasons that many age-related things (cancer, neurological decline, heart failure, etc.) occur. Maybe also something in there about brain cells reproducing, because another key factor of aging is that you can only lose brain cells once you’re born, hence mental decline in old age as important connections lose their constituent neurons and can’t grow them back. $\endgroup$ Commented May 8 at 18:29
  • $\begingroup$ Excellent point, I should have mentioned the neurons. Neurons are vital, and mortal, so perhaps they are granted some form of preservation or reproduction by the magic? or magic thinking. $\endgroup$ Commented May 8 at 18:32
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ really?, thats actually so interesting tysm $\endgroup$
    – finn
    Commented May 8 at 19:46
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ @controlgroup - this (you only lose brain cells after you're born) is not true. While adult neurogenesis is extremely limited in humans, it continues well after birth until mid-childhood. $\endgroup$
    – jdunlop
    Commented May 8 at 20:15
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I apologize - I am not a biologist and nothing I say on biology should be taken seriously. Same effect though - in late life neurons seldom reproduce was my point. $\endgroup$ Commented May 8 at 20:35

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .