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If weather was controlled in circuitous paths of airships, Swipes lets call the rainbands, where it rains predictably every 7 days, and these Swipes were 1000's of miles apart, what would the other lands be like? The globe has hundreds of these paths of rain, but there's thousands of miles between them that never get controlled weather support. I've built this world, but I have yet to entertain all the repercussions. All insights coveted.

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    $\begingroup$ The problem is that the weather control is effectively magic, which you haven't constrained, and the effects will vary radically depending on the size of the controlled regions, their location and the landscape over which they cross. Raining once every 7 days over a desert sounds interesting, though that probably wasn't what you meant. Raining once every seven days over a rainforest or monsoon region sounds potentially catastrophic to the local ecosystem. $\endgroup$ Apr 2 at 12:24
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    $\begingroup$ I guess rather than try to constrain the question more, perhaps it would be better to ask what you'd like to happen, and whether it is compatible? Evaluating a single scenario seems a much easier thing that simply listing all the ways in which a local climate could be changed. $\endgroup$ Apr 2 at 12:25
  • $\begingroup$ How wide are those Swipes? For example, nowadays airways are 10 nmi wide, at least in Europe they are. P.S. Please note that in very many places on Earth having rain only once every 7 days would be less rain than usual, at least most of the year. $\endgroup$
    – AlexP
    Apr 2 at 12:28
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    $\begingroup$ In what country do you live where rain-once-every-seven-days is considered "wet"? It would be considered "dry" in most of Europe, and it would be considered a devastating drought in Malaysia... $\endgroup$
    – AlexP
    Apr 2 at 12:32
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    $\begingroup$ For a world-building perspective weather is already chaotic and hard to predict so if you add in people messing with parts of it you could claim almost anything is happening outside of the controlled areas without breaking SoD as long as you don't know into "how" deeper than "the controlled weather areas cause it". $\endgroup$
    – Mike
    Apr 4 at 21:36

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All depends on whether you have a "butterfly effect on demand" magitech where you can very accurately forecast weather and influence it by subtle adjustments. Then you can do anything and keep accceptable weather everywhere.

Otherwise, without magitech, weather carries unfathomable amounts of energy both as wind inertia/pressure differences and as latent heat of water condensation. To manage it by brute force it you need even more energy. If using solar energy, this means orbital megaconstellations covering whole sky. If you want to reduce air humidity, keep whole continents in shade for days. To increase humidity, add concentrated/reflected sunlight to sea so that you have your scheduled rain. Or even microwave atmosphere on large scale.

Obviously such measures are very disruptive for life outside controlled areas. Also, you don't want your controlled areas affected by floods or dust storms from the outside, so some physical barriers will be necessary, too.

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Artifically created weather, implies stable weather, implies stable energy levels. Means a stable, constant difference to some part around it. As far as the outside world is concerned it is - like a invisible valley or mount of air-pressure. Thus rain rains down and endless thunderstorms rage. We have similar phenomena in this world, with very stable micro climates, generating the same border conditions - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catatumbo_lightning naturally. The strength of the border weather phenomena is of course dependent on the larger surroundings- it might be worser during the equivalent of El Nino. If a giant hurrican clashes against it, it might be very visible.

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