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My planet is roughly the size of Earth, with one large continent measuring 9,500 km (5,700 mi) across and no other large landmasses. There is one very wide and high mountain range (like the Andes) in the west, and a smaller, older range (like the Appalachians) in the east.

I am trying to assess whether my ocean currents are conductive to the regional climates that I'm aiming for on the second map, and if not, what said climates would be likely to look like. Assume everything from wind speed to ocean salinity is Earthlike.

Lastly, is the fact that my land is so heavily concentrated in one spot likely to cause problems? For reference, my planet is 11.8% land and 88.2% water. My continent is 59 million km2 while the planet is 500 million km2.enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ For future reference, please keep in mind that we allow only one question per post. In your case, it would actually make a lot of sense to ask just one of the questions first (either one, doesn't matter, "do my currents make sense for my desired climates?" vs. "does the single landmass cause problems?") because the answers to the first question has, I believe, a high likelihood of impacting the second. $\endgroup$
    – JBH
    Feb 16 at 17:17

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It makes little sense that in the north east part of your map the flow splits in two branches, a cold southward one and a warm eastward one.

Why do they spit if there is nothing forcing them to do so? What cools a part of the flow?

Same for the warm branch pointing south around the southernmost point of te continent without anything to deviate it.

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    $\begingroup$ I'm still learning about ocean currents, but looking at the ones on Earth, it seems like some do take random turns. Thanks for your help! $\endgroup$
    – www
    Feb 16 at 23:11

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