2
$\begingroup$

In a world that has only daytime would it rain? In this particular magic world that I’ve created the land is plentiful and the soil is rich and perfect for farming but, it’s always daytime.This land is not on earth so I have a hard time imagining that anything would be able to grow in such a condition where there is only sunny skies and no night without the existence of rain. Would it still rain? How can the water supply be sustainable without it evaporating? Would there still be things like rivers and waterfalls? For context and location,The world is kind of like wonderland in the sense that it has no specific location and one would only know about it if they were to go there. The reason there is no night time is because it’s a planet that randomly appears around different parts of the sun and only the sun

$\endgroup$
9
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ The world is kind of like wonderland in the sense that it has no specific location and one would only know about it if they were to go there. The reason there is no night time is because it’s a planet that randomly appears around different parts of the sun and only the sun and there is another planet that does the same but only around the moon if any of that helps $\endgroup$
    – Klown
    Commented Aug 4, 2023 at 18:46
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @Klown Please add this to your question. It's a critical part of why it's so different from other worlds. It could impact what you would get vs our good old Earth (the wettest and liveliest planet we know the most about :) ) $\endgroup$ Commented Aug 4, 2023 at 18:54
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ That clarification makes things more confusing, not less (at least to me). A planet that appears in random places around our sun might not have a regular day cycle, but it would still necessarily have a day side and a night side at any given point in time. $\endgroup$ Commented Aug 4, 2023 at 21:40
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ if the sun never sets the planet will warm until it is radiating the same amount of heat as it is receiving from the sun, meaning liquid water is indeed impossible. $\endgroup$
    – John
    Commented Aug 5, 2023 at 1:02
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @Klown since this is magical I see no reason to provide an explanation beyond "it's just how magic works" thats the point of magic, it defies explanation and allows things to exist simply because the author wants them to exist. $\endgroup$ Commented Aug 7, 2023 at 15:57

2 Answers 2

3
$\begingroup$

Klown, welcome. Yes, on a planet with an Earth-like atmosphere receiving as much light as Earth does, it will rain. Different parts of that planet would still heat to different temperatures, which would create some sort of atmospheric circulation (it may resemble a permanent monsoon blowing from the cooler seas towards the hotter landmasses). If anything, it will rain more due to perpetual daylight causing more evaporation. The planet would be of course much hotter, but would stay below the boiling point of water unless you go overboard by surrounding it with say three or more Suns, because the hotter atmosphere will also have a higher pressure, ehich in turn would raise the boiling point of water somewhat.

$\endgroup$
10
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Thank you for the welcome. With your answer in mind would this place be inhabitable? $\endgroup$
    – Klown
    Commented Aug 4, 2023 at 19:06
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ the planet would be much hotter than the vapor point of water, it will warm until it is emitting 1,361 watts of power per square meter, or until it is around ~120 degrees C. $\endgroup$
    – John
    Commented Aug 5, 2023 at 1:22
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @ihaveideas except the reflectivity of the earth is quite low, and it will get lower with no ice and a warmer atmosphere. And that is not accounting for the internally produced heat of the planet an additional 91.6 mW/m2 it needs to radiate. feel free to add your own calculation until you do I am downvoting your answer. $\endgroup$
    – John
    Commented Aug 5, 2023 at 2:06
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ @ihaveideas no but it is common courtesy to tell a poster why you are downvoting their answer. Your answer appears to be a simple guess with nothing backing it up. $\endgroup$
    – John
    Commented Aug 5, 2023 at 13:29
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ The numbers here seem very Earth-centric to me. As far as I read, OP did not state that this magical planet is the same distance from the sun as Earth, nor did they say anything about its atmosphere. Couldn't it essentially be any temperature imaginable, depending on those details? $\endgroup$ Commented Aug 7, 2023 at 17:50
3
$\begingroup$

For empirical evidences of what happens to the atmospheric circulation with the lack of day night cycle, we can look at Uranus, which thanks to its extreme axial tilt (almost parallel to its orbital plane) is pretty much in a similar condition:

In 1986, Voyager 2 found that the visible southern hemisphere of Uranus can be subdivided into two regions: a bright polar cap and dark equatorial bands. Besides the large-scale banded structure, Voyager 2 observed ten small bright clouds, most lying several degrees to the north from the collar. In all other respects Uranus looked like a dynamically dead planet in 1986. [...] For a short period from March to May 2004, large clouds appeared in the Uranian atmosphere, giving it a Neptune-like appearance. Why this sudden upsurge in activity occurred is not fully known, but it appears that Uranus's extreme axial tilt results in extreme seasonal variations in its weather.

It looks like the lack of a day-night cycle affects negatively the cloud formation and as a consequence, I would add, the possibility of having rain.

The explanation for this is that a day-night cycle, with the change it causes in the atmospheric temperature, produces those gradients which are needed to feed atmospheric circulation and cloud formation.

$\endgroup$
0

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .