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I know an orange sky is achievable in at least two ways; large particles in the air (for example: smoke); or a thicker and:or denser atmosphere, so that light is getting bounced around and only longer wavelengths make it to the surface (this is basically what happens at sunrise and sunset). Could this be paired with a blue star, that is visibly blue on the surface, or would the light be made orange like the sky?

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    $\begingroup$ Hi Nogus, please wait at least a few days before accepting an answer. That gives other people more time to answer, which resultantly gives you a greater variety of high-quality answers to choose from. $\endgroup$
    – M S
    Jun 30, 2023 at 19:41

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Dense smoke will result in a blue glow around an orange sun with an orange sky. Because the eye cannot perceive color differences at extremely high brightness, the sun will appear as a blindingly white disk surrounded by a blue glow. The mind will associate the blue with the color of the sun. However, an appropriately calibrated sensor will record orange light, and reflected sunlight from the environment will be tinted orange.

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Yes... except for the part when you are probably dead.

While blue stars have more light in the blue end of the spectrum, they still emit plenty of red and green light as well. So, as long as your atmosphere is thick enough to scatter enough light, there will be plenty of long wave length light left to reach the surface... but there is a catch. The surface of any such planet will not be inhabitable. Blue stars only live for up to 20 million years, and it takes about 50 million years for a plant to form a solid crust; so, if you are on any planet looking up at a blue star, it probably means you are standing in a volcanic hell scape of molten lava surrounded by a constant barrage of meteors and comets.

So, if you were on such a planet, it would be in some manner of artificial habitat designed to withstand an environment that makes Venus feel like a calm autumn day. So, any visualization you may have of the sky is probably going to be through heavily filtered cameras, and not an accurate peek into the world around you anyway.

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