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One of my planets has surface waters that are incredibly rich in oxidized iron, and I was intrigued by the possibility of alternate materials for bones when I came across Stephen Gillett's Clorox planet where the animal bones and tree trunks are made of stuff like PVC due to the excess of chlorine in the atmosphere, so I was wondering, is there any iron-based material (short of literally just iron / steel) that organisms could use as a hydroxyapatite-analogue?

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    $\begingroup$ If the iron is oxidized, wouldn't the oceans be red? Which is kinda cool. $\endgroup$
    – Martamo
    Jun 5, 2023 at 10:51
  • $\begingroup$ @Martamo Yes actually! The oceans are red and the landmasses are purple due to the native plant life. $\endgroup$
    – Massi
    Jun 5, 2023 at 13:01
  • $\begingroup$ What is the solar mass of the star? $\endgroup$
    – Martamo
    Jun 5, 2023 at 13:09
  • $\begingroup$ @Martamo Two stars actually, the planet orbits a binary of 1.07 and 0.75 solar masses. $\endgroup$
    – Massi
    Jun 5, 2023 at 13:41
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    $\begingroup$ BTW, please remember to not take supposition as fact. What Dr. Gillett did was propose an interesting planetary ecology - but humanity has no actual proof of any form of life other than what's on Earth. Thus, he's not proposing a truth, or a theory, or even a hypothesis. It's merely clever - and very fictional. $\endgroup$
    – JBH
    Jun 5, 2023 at 15:24

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Yes!

There is a snail that uses iron (iron sulfides to be exact) as part of it's shells. While normally shells are calcium based.

I don't know how it would work. I cannot say for certain that it is possible. But one creature on earth has done something similar so it is plausible and believable.

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