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This is a question relating to my Safespace sci-fi setting, in which the Unified Intergalactic League attempts to keep peace between the litany of sapiods (a classification for intelligent creatures that can communicate and repress violence and other primal urges) that inhabit the kiloparsec of the universe that is Safespace. One of these species, the Ebline, are a lot like ants (and no, I did not steal the idea from Orson Scott Card). I was designing their starfighter ships, and got the idea for all the ships being able to link and form some kind of giant wall of guns. So my question is, what design of starfighter would be able to interlock and form a larger warship, while still maintaining its combat abilities?

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    $\begingroup$ I try not to vote to close new user questions, but this is an example of a question that's either too opinion-based or too story-based. Depending on the technology used, any shape works. No shape is necessarily better than another (meaning all the answers have equal value, which is prohibited, see help center). In fact, since interlocking components could be extended from the ship, the shape of the ship becomes entirely irrelevant (unless it meets a story need, which is off-topic). Because of that, I think you're asking the wrong question. (*Continued*) $\endgroup$
    – JBH
    Commented Jan 12, 2023 at 16:11
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    $\begingroup$ ... I strongly recommend that you edit your question and change it (before anyone answers...) to ask "what mechanism could be used to interlock one-man space fighters?" Please note that, even then, the question is difficult. You'll need to explain the technology of your fighters and the basic nature of one-on-one space combat in your universe. We can assume materials that can handle almost any stress, but how those mechanisms connect to the frame of the ship would impose a restriction on how the ship can be designed. And you should decide if you want energy locks or not. $\endgroup$
    – JBH
    Commented Jan 12, 2023 at 16:14
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    $\begingroup$ The word you were looking for and did not know how to find is tessellation. $\endgroup$
    – AlexP
    Commented Jan 12, 2023 at 19:34

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I suggest hexagonal craft, shaped specifically like a hexagonal prism. The six sides possess magnetic clamps, the front is equipped with lasers/sensory equipment, while a fusion rocket at the back is used for propulsion. When the ships link up, they do indeed form a “wall of guns”. Ideally a swarm of ships should be controlled by some kind of distributed AI to solve problems of steering the ships when linked together.

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    $\begingroup$ And FYI, don’t listen to these guys telling you this is off topic. This is an awesome question. +1 upvote. $\endgroup$
    – user98816
    Commented Jan 12, 2023 at 16:54
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    $\begingroup$ And FYI, this just caused me to vote to close. Prove to me that your answer is objectively better than any other answer based solely on the OP's question. -1 Part of your participation on this Stack is expected to be helping new users learn how to use Stack Exchange (including all their rules) correctly. $\endgroup$
    – JBH
    Commented Jan 12, 2023 at 17:00
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    $\begingroup$ I have a guilty secret.... sometimes I upvote a question which is off-topic just because I like it. Then I vote to close and leave a comment how to improve the question. Seems like a contradiction? Suits my nature (which is human and thus full of contradictions). $\endgroup$ Commented Jan 13, 2023 at 1:17
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The question really depends on one thing:

Are these fighters ever expected to enter an Atmosphere or even fight an Atmosphere?

If they are purely space based - then realistically any geometric shape, such as a Cube would be best.

without the concern of Drag/wind resistance, there is no reason to have a streamlined shape

The primary concerns of such a vessel would be:

  • The functional design of it's weaponry (does the weapon need a barrel/antennae etc.)
  • keeping the Mass of the vessel as close to the centre as possible (this is to help with maneuverability - having more mass away from the centre means there is a greater moment needed to turn
  • a regular geometric shape could also have the added bonus of making a determination of direction of travel much harder

The downsides being that a cube shaped fighter just doesn't look that cool. And as we all know - the first rule of any Aerial/space combat is that coolness > everything else.

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