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Not actual gold, only golden in color. This is entirely for appearance wise only, how would gold-coloured blood look on someone who is very, VERY pale. Not only skin tone, but how would it affect things like their lips, inside of their mouth, waterline of their eyes, etc.. Also, would those same characteristics of the skin carry over to someone with darker skin or would the melanin cover it up?

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    $\begingroup$ So basically take a miner who hasn't gotten out of their cave for two decades, and give them golden blood, I see ^^. This brings up a minor question : Does the golden blood change color when its nutriments are absorbed by the system, like it does with red arteries vs blue veins? A transition from clean gold to a slightly copperish color, for instance? $\endgroup$ Oct 21, 2022 at 7:16
  • $\begingroup$ Please clarify your specific problem or provide additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it's hard to tell exactly what you're asking. $\endgroup$
    – Community Bot
    Oct 21, 2022 at 7:17
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    $\begingroup$ Note that the lips (and areolas) are reddish because they are colored by phaeomelanin, not because blood shows through, which it doesn't. $\endgroup$
    – AlexP
    Oct 21, 2022 at 7:40
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    $\begingroup$ @Tortliena Miner who spend two decades underground eating gold ore in the dark. $\endgroup$
    – Daron
    Oct 21, 2022 at 11:55

2 Answers 2

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Less Rosy

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Here is a pale person with red blood. You can see the skin is light in color and rosy where there is more blood near the surface. If the blood is orange instead of red, the rosy parts are less pronounced and more orange.

AlexP says lips (and areolas) are red because of red pigment and not blood. You can of course have the lips be orange by having orange pigment instead.

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Feel free to make your own image for the areolas.

Hair color is not based on blood color.

Sometimes these pale people become redder when they blush.

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This is because blood rushes to the surface of the skin. If the blood is gold instead of red then your blushers might look like this:

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There are actually two real life compounds that can perform the same functions as blood and have an appearance that can be close to blood. The first is called Coboglobin and uses Cobalt as the base to bind oxygen to it (the function of Iron in every red blooded human). When oxygenated, Cobogloben is colorless, so your special effects team can render bleeding by show trickles of water like liquid from the alien's wounds. An otherwise human looking alien with Cobogloben based blood would look very pale, but still human. Like Hemogloben, Cobogloben does age and needs to be replaced by the body, but Hemogloben ages in terms of weeks while Cobogloben takes days which means blushing can be explained, but it's not as strong. Cobogloben is not naturally occurring in Earth Life and was created in a lab synthetically.

The second type that can meet this definition and is easier to state what the skin would look like is chloro-carbonyl-bis(tri phenylphosphine)-iridium (try saying that five times fast). Instead of Iron, this compound uses Iridium to bind Oxygen it (We'll refer to it as I-blood because I am not going to refer to it as chloro-carbonyl-bis(tri phenylphosphine)-iridium every time I have to say it). In a deoxygenated state it's bright yellow and will become a sullen orange when Oxygenated. Some concerns for your alien doctors are that any species with this blood would have a very complex system of lungs, as I-blood is less effecient than Hemoglobe (4 times less) and there could be some intersting biochemistry because it can also carry hydrogen in a similar manner to Oxygen, which our blood cannot do... ask a bio-chemist for more details. In terms of what their skin looks like, that's actually easy. If they are outwardly human in all other respects, you will want them to be exclusively played by actors of African Descent with very dark skin... I-Blood, when oxygenated is extremely photosensitive and will decompose if exposed to strong light over a period of days or weeks (and turn form orange, to green and then bluish-black during this process.). So anyone actor who has little natural melanin in their skin is going to get your biochemist fans to complain loudly. You also need doctors who can perform surgeries in almost zero light environments.

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