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I read through https://simple.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Argon it says that argon can be used in doping. If humans have to settle down on a planet, that has the nitrogen of earth swapped for argon, can they or the next generations adapt?

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There shouldn't be a big problem.

In doping, Argon is used to create low oxygen conditions. Athletes train in low oxygen conditions to stimulate overproduction of red blood cells and greater oxgygen carrying capacity. However in the latest version of the doping list, Argon isn't mentioned. So Argon does not itself enhance performance.

Moreover, unlike Xenon, Argon doesn't have sedative or narcotic properties. The action of Xenon is directly related to its large molecular weight, not its chemical actions. Like, for example chloroform, gases can induce anaesthesia without any chemical action. Argon, however is lighter and doesn't have this effect. Lab rats were able to breath 70% argon without ill effects.

An argon-oxygen atmosphere should be breathable, though there may be some difficulties transitioning from nitrogen to argon as the inert factor in the atmosphere, so this should be done slowly.

There are lots of "how ever did it get that way!" Nitrogen is a pretty common element, more common than Argon. And it is pretty ubiquitous in biological molecules. So, if you are being "hard", you'd need a clever explanation of what happened to all the Nitrogen, and how life exists without it, and if life doesn't exist on the planet, where the Oxygen is coming from.

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    $\begingroup$ /So Argon does itself enhance performance/ typo? Seems like it should be "does not". But I am not confident enough to correct. This once. $\endgroup$
    – Willk
    Sep 10, 2022 at 18:05
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Nitrogen is the 4th most abundant element in the human body, after oxygen, carbon, and hydrogen. Every amino acid contains nitrogen, and thus every protein. DNA and RNA both contain large amounts of nitrogen, along with many, many other components of Earthly biochemistry.

We do not obtain the nitrogen we need directly from the atmosphere, we get it from plants capable of fixing that nitrogen in more biologically available form, and from animals that eat those plants. Humans could survive on such a world as long as their food supply lasts, but long-term survival of any form of Earth life would be reliant on recycling and importing of nitrogen or on concentrating what nitrogen does exist there.

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Argon is a noble gas, so it's inert. It wouldn't cause too much trouble, but life would need to adapt to having less nitrogen to work with, as there's only trace amounts of atmospheric nitrogen on that planet.

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