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Okay. Let's assume that you are a sixteen gram mouse. For the sake of SCIENCE! you strap on an accelerometer and jump into a hurricane, and are quickly sent flying.

As we all know, mice are the smartest animal in the universe. Thus, you really quickly figure out the terminal velocity for you. The question is, since you're not going straight down, do you ever hit terminal velocity? Can you even hit terminal velocity if you aren't in freefall?

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closed as off-topic by 2012rcampion, HDE 226868, bowlturner, Frostfyre, Monty Wild Aug 25 '15 at 5:02

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question does not appear to be about worldbuilding, within the scope defined in the help center." – 2012rcampion, HDE 226868, bowlturner, Frostfyre, Monty Wild
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ This probably should have been asked on Physics SE. $\endgroup$ – DaaaahWhoosh Aug 24 '15 at 14:01
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    $\begingroup$ It seems to me that "the smartest animal in the universe" might do all its calculations before jumping in the hurricane. Also, a hundred-plus years of science fiction notwithstanding, experimenting on yourself isn't really a positive indicator of intelligence either. : ) $\endgroup$ – Doug Warren Aug 24 '15 at 14:02
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Without anything to make the mouse go faster than the hurricane, the mouse will go as fast as the winds around it. To go faster requires force, as does going slower. An accelerometer is not capable of making a mouse go faster and only marginally effective at making it go slower. After the abrupt start, the mouse might actually have a fairly pleasant ride since it is going the same speed as the surrounding winds. Stopping will be a bit of a problem though.

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  • $\begingroup$ Ah, okay, so at the given speed. $\endgroup$ – Nefer007 Aug 24 '15 at 13:53
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    $\begingroup$ Yep. Terminal velocity is the balance point between gravity's acceleration and the drag of the falling object. If "falling" sideways, there is no acceleration other than the wind. For an object like a mouse, there isn't any in that shape that will cause the mouse to go faster or slower than the surrounding windspeeds. $\endgroup$ – Green Aug 24 '15 at 13:54
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The terminal velocity is unaffected from side winds.

Proof

Use an arrow and direct it on a target. Release both the arrow and the target and let them fall. The arrow always hits the target because motion in other dimensions does not disturb free fall.

Now to the mouse in the hurrican...that will not be a pleasant ride because the terminal velocity of the mouse is much smaller than the extremely strong updrafts inside hurricanes which can reach 200 km/h (120 mph) with altitudes over 10 km. So what will happen is that the mouse rises until it either suffocates in thin, unbreathable atmosphere with high water content or it will be slain by a hailstone big as a hand or it will be electrocuted by lightning or it will freeze to death with temperatures reaching -40 °C/°F.

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