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Let's say, there is a superhero with the powers like Superman(or Omni Man from the Invincible). How would he travel the world with his partner, for example from New York to Paris in the shortest possible time without injuring his partner? Would the partner piggyback ride him or he would carry him/her in his hands? Also, take into consideration how would normal body take the pressure when traveling at high speed, temperature, etc... Thank you for your answers in advance.

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    $\begingroup$ Never read old Superman comics, eh? Supes had this covered by wrapping Lois or Jimmy in his cape, which though elastic somehow was airtight. (eyeroll) $\endgroup$
    – Zeiss Ikon
    Jun 27 at 11:42
  • $\begingroup$ Yeah, I think later they changed it to some kind of force field projection. helped explain how he was able to lift ships and buildings without them falling apart from structural stress. Simi related note: Do not read Larry Niven on how impossible it would be for superman to successfully mate with Lois Lane. $\endgroup$
    – Gillgamesh
    Jun 27 at 12:15
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    $\begingroup$ I am sure that in-universe the Super Mann has carried around several different normies. Could you please show your research indicating chapter and verse all those occasions you have encountered in the canon, and why they are not satisfactory for your story? $\endgroup$
    – AlexP
    Jun 27 at 12:16
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    $\begingroup$ Aaaaww, @Gillgamesh, "Man of Steel, Woman of Kleenex" was one of my favorite Niven pieces that wasn't a Ringworld novel... $\endgroup$
    – Zeiss Ikon
    Jun 27 at 13:05
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    $\begingroup$ Given that the first Superman movie included him flying around the world backwards and going back in time, getting somewhere in "the shortest possible time" could be an ... interesting ... exercise. $\endgroup$
    – bta
    Jun 28 at 0:17

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"Realistically", he would probably have to put them in an environmentally controlled container and carry that, taking care not to apply too high accellerations.

If he carries them openly, they will suffocate, freeze, or get shredded by the airstream. Unless they go much slower than conventional airtravel.

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  • $\begingroup$ We are speaking of the Super Mann here. No, the passenger(s) won't suffocate, freeze, or get shredded by the air stream. Even their clothing will survive the trip intact. Fairy tales do care at all about realism, continuity, internal consistency and other such philistine concerns. $\endgroup$
    – AlexP
    Jun 27 at 12:23
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    $\begingroup$ @AlexP in this case the answer would be "however they want". but the last sentence of the Q explicitly asks for these concerns. $\endgroup$
    – ths
    Jun 27 at 12:33
  • $\begingroup$ This is pretty much what I was going to say - a bullet-like "airplane" powered by the hero, with an acceleration chair and life support. $\endgroup$
    – DWKraus
    Jun 27 at 12:45
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    $\begingroup$ @AlexP : is this the kind of comment you post to every question and answer out of habit? With this mindset we should close this site entirely, or at least forbid any type of question asking about realism, because every single answer would be "it's a fictional story, so there is no need for realism". While, in fact, there is an increasing demand for realism or at least internal consistency in fiction. $\endgroup$
    – vsz
    Jun 28 at 7:23
  • $\begingroup$ @AlexP between fairy tales where nothing matters, and hard sci fi where everyhing is fact, there's the "one big lie" genre where one blatantly counterfactual element is put in an otherwise science-supported context and explored to the fullest. e.g. Mass Effect where the lie is Eezo, or the time travel event in 1632. That's a perfectly valid way to want to write a story, realism is not all-or-nothing. $\endgroup$
    – KeizerHarm
    Jun 28 at 7:26
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Airplane

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You must put Louis Lane in an airtight pressure-controlled container. These already exist. They are called airplanes.

Put your darling inside an airplane. Pick up the plane and fly to wherever you are going. I suggest a small plane that is (a) propeller powered so there is not jetstream and (b) reinforced with girders on the wings so it can withstand greater speed than the engines could ever give out.

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    $\begingroup$ Nope, airplanes are far from airtight. They rely on continuing to pump air into the plane. No power = no air being pumped in. No air = no air being pumped in. $\endgroup$ Jun 27 at 20:59
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    $\begingroup$ Reinforcing the wings isn't the important bit, it's having an extremely reinforced section for generic brand superbeing to hold onto and push/pull the plane that matters more. Real planes have a point to attach a ground vehicle for low-speed towing, but nothing for being towed at supersonic speeds through the air. $\endgroup$ Jun 27 at 23:29
  • $\begingroup$ @LorenPechtel I have been in an airplane before. When it was above the clouds in fact. The air was breathable. $\endgroup$
    – Daron
    Jun 28 at 10:54
  • $\begingroup$ @KerrAvon2055 Pull the plane by the part that makes it go. The plane is already designed to be strong where the engines or propeller joins the rest of the plane. Either a chain attached to the propeller, or a pair of nets behind the engines which go to chains that go to the man in steel. $\endgroup$
    – Daron
    Jun 28 at 11:16
  • $\begingroup$ @Daron Note that I said air is being pumped in. A jetliner spends a substantial amount of power on this, if the pumps stop you'll soon find the air far too thin to breathe. There has to be a fair amount of turnover to keep the passengers supplied with oxygen, it's cheaper to let it leak than make it airtight and add a vent. $\endgroup$ Jun 29 at 2:36
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USING AN AIRTIGHT CONTAINER

Traveling at any speed above ca. 80 km/h requires protective clothing or cabins, since the airflow across a normally clothed body would cool the passenger too much to be comfortable and could kill the passenger at higher speeds. Airflow can also make it difficult to breathe - the generated wind will literally take your breath away. Both problems become greater if traveling at altitude where the air is thinner and colder. In older Superman comics he habitually wraps anybody he carries in his invincible cape, which might solve the cold problem, but not the breathing problem.

Using an airtight container would do away with both problems, at least for quick trips. For longer trips, the container would require an air supply and some insulation against cold. A molded or soft seat or couch would also be required for comfortable trips.

Given such a container, acceleration would be the limiting factor. People in general are only able to withstand a few gees for extended periods of time, and then only in specially designed seats. Accelerating at 1 gee (to which we have to add the planet's gravitation to measure discomfort) half the way and decelerating the other half, you can get anywhere in the world in 50 minutes. If you want to do it faster, you can pile on more gees, which can become pretty uncomfortable.

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  • $\begingroup$ 50 minutes?? That's for ballistic trajectories, not brachistochrone trajectories. $\endgroup$ Jun 27 at 21:09
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    $\begingroup$ @LorenPechtel: I calculated it as how much time it would take to travel 11,000 km in a straight line at a constant acceleration of 1 g, then doubled it to include deceleration. Yes, I discounted the curvature of the earth for simplicity, but it doesn't make all that much difference. Nor did I account for the difference in Earth's rotational speed at points of departure and arrival, since that would vary by latitude. Feel free to do the complex calculation and see how much my simplified estimate is off. If it is off by more than 10 minutes, I will concede that my estimate was too simplictic. $\endgroup$ Jun 28 at 7:59
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As her plane

"Lois" just buys a piloting license. But instead of tanking fuel and running the motor all the time, she'll start the engine only for launch and landing, and during the flight, "Clark" will take over and carry the specialty reinforced cabin from a pair of handles at the maximum airspeed the plane should be possible on its own.

Besides having a suspiciously low fuel bill, nobody will be the wiser ever. And even the kerosene bill can be fixed by paying the fuel guy to put the rest of the fuel that should have been used into the tanks of other planes.

Ask Dr. Strange/Beat Doctor Doom

"Clark" is a superhuman and fights together with others. One of those surely is a magic/science wielder that can offer direct place to place teleportation. And if that guy belongs to the other side: Punch them a few times, then forgive them - but also take their device.

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