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I learned that is theorized that a planet can be "superhabitable" if it has a size that is roughly twice that of Earth, the slightly higher gravity would mean a denser atmosphere with more rain and nutrients, the mantle would stay hot for longer and keep plate tectonics healthy for a long time, the plane would be "rounder" than Earth, with smaller peaks and valleys, and thus would be a sort of "puddles" planet, people would likely think of it more of an archipelago planet instead.

I also read this should affect the color of sun-powered life, but found no explanation for that, I assume it has to do with the denser atmosphere affecting what colors can penetrate on the planet, seemly such planets would tend to have more hydrogen than normal in the atmosphere, alongside with a lot more water vapor and rains.

So... can someone tell me what color the sun-powered life is supposed to have?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superhabitable_planet

Note: differently from many questions, this is not about the star, this is about the atmosphere, it is a question about how the atmosphere of superhabitable planets, affect the optics and result in different forms of light to be available, regardless of the source.

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    $\begingroup$ There are a lot of questions on this community on the color of flora under different conditions, have you searched any of them? $\endgroup$
    – L.Dutch
    Jun 23 at 15:47
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    $\begingroup$ It depends on the star the planet orbits, and several other factors. Ideally leaves would be black, because they absorb and use all available frequencies of light.. but it depends on the process the plants use to convert light to 'energy'. $\endgroup$
    – Richard
    Jun 23 at 15:51
  • $\begingroup$ @L.Dutch yes of course, but none of them seemly replied my question, but if you DO find a question that epxlains this and add as link to duplicate, then I would happily read the answer, and go my way, maybe delete this question. $\endgroup$
    – speeder
    Jun 23 at 15:52
  • $\begingroup$ Free hydrogen gas? Not for long if there's oxygen too - what's the solution there? $\endgroup$ Jun 23 at 16:33
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    $\begingroup$ ... And anyway, the inescapable answer is that (1) there is no one "color of flora" and (2) the dominant green of Earth is an evolutionary accident -- we still have extant photosynthetic lineages which use red, or yellow-brown, or cyan pigments. (And the green Chlorophytes a.k.a. Viridiplantae are only dominant on land. In the sea, they are one of many lineages, with the yellow-brown Phaeophytes a strong competitor.) $\endgroup$
    – AlexP
    Jun 23 at 18:57

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Probably the opposite color of the spectrum of the star, should plant-like vegetation evolve pigments ideal for the planet. We all know about chlorophyll but nothing else. Most of the sun's radiation is in the red range, and chlorophyll is a perfect contrast. Chlorophyll is the most successful of all plant pigments here on Earth.

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    $\begingroup$ The sun is a yellow star, not a red star, and we know about pigments other than chlorophyll. $\endgroup$
    – L.Dutch
    Jun 23 at 18:32
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    $\begingroup$ We know about lots of pigments involved in photosynthesis. (All land plants three or four different ones.) That land plants are green is due to their descent from green algae. Other algal lineages have other colors; it's just that land plants emerged from Charophyte algae, and not from Ochrophyte algae (yellow brown), or Rhodophyte algae (red), or the Glaucophyte algae (cyan). $\endgroup$
    – AlexP
    Jun 23 at 18:44
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, but chlorophyll utterly dominates plant life. Much of the sun's radiation is in the infrared zone, which is invisible to human eyes. What we see averages yellow, so atmospheric absorption will t play a role on a habitable planet. If you don't believe me, then look at how red the sun looks when its rays go through more atmosphere around. sunset. Chlorophyll absorbs reddish light and reflects, on the average, green. $\endgroup$ Jun 23 at 19:27
  • $\begingroup$ @PaulBrower: Chlorophyll absorbs both red (= longer wavelength) light and blue (= shorter wavelength) light. But overall it doesn't really matter -- photosynthesis uses only about 5% of the absorbed light energy; which is actually a big problem for plants living in warm and not very humid climates, because plants have very little ability to shed unwanted heat without wasting vast amount of water. $\endgroup$
    – AlexP
    Jun 23 at 21:22

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