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So, I've been developing a worldbuilding project, and I have an issue with this one planet's star, the planet it's called Xin Anhui, that means "new Anhui" a province in China, based on the fact that spanish conquistadors named towns and settlements like towns back in spain, the star of this system is called "Huǒqiú", fireball in english, this star is a G type, just like our sun, but it has a 13 hour daycycle, and the planet is slightly smaller than earth, having in mind that in our homestar is called Sun, and the event is called "sunrise" it would be a Huǒqiúrise?, Huǒqiúset?, or maybe a name referring to darkenss, peace when the night comes, change, , I would love to hear other more convincing names for the event.

Thank you in advance

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    $\begingroup$ What language do the people of Xin Anhui speak? Are you "translating" their speech into English? $\endgroup$
    – void_ptr
    May 9, 2022 at 3:21
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    $\begingroup$ What's your metric for "more convincing"? Worldbuilding.SE isn't about open-ended discussion but about solving concrete questions. "What should I call X?" is usually a prime example of something that is based on opinion and not really solvable. $\endgroup$
    – Cadence
    May 9, 2022 at 4:00
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    $\begingroup$ Just a thought, but there are various language sites on the network: Constructed Languages, Linguistics, and of course English Language & Usage and Spanish Language. You may find inspiration for this specific type of question there. $\endgroup$ May 9, 2022 at 6:14
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    $\begingroup$ Our star is called the sun in English. In Romanian it is called soarele, in Turkish it is called güneş, and in Mandarint it is called 太阳 / 太陽 (tàiyáng). Note that one does not normally translate the component lexemes of a Mandarin word; for example, the two components of 太阳 / 太陽 (tàiyáng) mean "extremely bright". Note than having special words for the rising and setting of the sun is not universal; for example, Romance languages use phrases like "the rising/setting or the sun", using the same words for rising or setting as when speaking of the moon or stars. $\endgroup$
    – AlexP
    May 9, 2022 at 6:21
  • $\begingroup$ You forgeting about very important piece of chinese culture - word puzzles. Is almost sure that they make some kind of "rabbit peeking" for sunrise and "walnut hiding" for sunset $\endgroup$
    – Kamitergh
    May 9, 2022 at 11:33

3 Answers 3

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Why wouldn't they still just call it sunrise/sunset? they would probably refer to the star at the centre of their solar system as a sun.

It's a fairly common trope in sci-fi settings that Earth and our sun get renamed to something more specific, so Terra orbits Sol, Xin Anhui orbits Huǒqiú.

the sun then loses it's status as a proper noun and just becomes the reference to the local star so you don't need to change all the related terms. What term will you use for the burn you get for being outside all day, Huǒqiúburn?

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  • $\begingroup$ Technically, our sun is named "Sol" in astronomy anyway and every fusion reactor is a sun. $\endgroup$
    – Trish
    May 9, 2022 at 7:31
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The names of the planet and the star are taken from Chinese language. Then why are you looking for sunrise and sunset in English?

Take sunrise (Rì chū) and sunset (Rìluò) from Chinese also.

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Not all languages use sunrise and sunset, your perspective is being skewed by using English.

For example Italian uses "alba" for the moment when the star appears above the horizon and "tramonto" for when the star disappears. Alba comes from the Latin for "white", referring to the whitening sky when the sun starts to rise, while tramonto seems to come from "between the mountains". My own dialect just uses "getting brighter" and "getting darker", respectively, referring to the sky, not to the Sun at all.

You can come up with any term you want, as long as it has some relationship with what is happening. I just doubt that anybody would associate night fall with peace and rest. At least in human culture, darkness has always been associated with fear, maybe because of the memories carved in our mammalian brain since the time of when we had to hide from dinosaurs.

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  • $\begingroup$ Italian alba means "dawn"; the rising of the sun is properly levar del sole. The rising or setting of the sun, the moon, or any star are levar(e) and tramonto. Note than the moon and the star also use the verb tramontare for the action to go below the horizon: Il tramonto della luna is a quite well-known poem by Leopardi. $\endgroup$
    – AlexP
    May 9, 2022 at 6:36

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