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The fish of this world have been replaced with similar creatures with a highly conserved anatomy. They have only around 4 vertebrae in their torso. Their tail has a few more vertebrae, but still not many. They have a ribcage in their torso, with no bones in the belly

How would this creature most easily get about on land?

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    $\begingroup$ How much is "a few"? $\endgroup$
    – L.Dutch
    Commented Apr 3, 2022 at 19:05
  • $\begingroup$ How many wings a/o legs do they have? $\endgroup$
    – elemtilas
    Commented Apr 3, 2022 at 22:57
  • $\begingroup$ Also, how long are the vertebrae in comparison to their torsos & tails? In other words, how rigid is their spine? Also, how many ribs per vertebra? $\endgroup$
    – elemtilas
    Commented Apr 3, 2022 at 22:57

2 Answers 2

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Like a snake or, more probably like an earthworm

What you described is basically an invertebrate, so take inspiration from how invertebrates move, earthworms move by expanding and contracting muscles, it's not very fast but with this number of bones it's really your best bet. Technically it is possible for them to move like snakes, for example sidewind, but I'm not 100% sure how feasible this is. You didn't specified if those animals have any other boneless appendages, but they for sure will evolve them to help with movement, think snail's foot for example.

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An alternative would be a way of walking (of sorts).

This primitive robot has two feet interlacing in such a way that they're able to raise one leg and move it forward without losing balance between steps:

Small primitive walking robot from the 1980s.

Copyright unknown, Dwightreid.com 2022, fair usage.

Although the proportions of the robot are all wrong, it being top-heavy, a similar arrangement can be made with ribs - enabling them to "walk" on their ribcage. Direction changes would be effected by differing stride-lengths and by slight adjustment with the tail, like a land-rudder.

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