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I was watching a quite interesting Kurzgesagt video, Here. How would the surface of Venus look after freezing the CO2 out of the atmosphere? At around 5:28, we see that the atmospheric pressure is 3 bar and it's -81C which is not ideal but livable with some sort of oxygen source.

What I'm wondering is how would the surface of Venus look specifically? The snow is mostly Carbon Dioxide, so at a large scale, how would that look on the Venusian landscape? Also, how would it change in terms of erosion from all the CO2 rain? Would the landscape be sharp and volatile or smooth? How would the atmospheric color change? I am an environment artist trying to create a Venusian landscape, just wondering how I can be as scientifically accurate as possible!

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The snow is mostly Carbon Dioxide, so at a large scale, how would that look on the Venusian landscape?

On a large scale, it would be essentially indistinguishable from water snow. Dry ice crystals are cubical rather than hexagonal, but that only matters if you are looking closely. Large quantities of liquid CO2 even have a similar (although even weaker) slightly blue color as water.

Also, how would it change in terms of erosion from all the CO2 rain? Would the landscape be sharp and volatile or smooth?

Not much. You would probably get some distinct fluid channel features carved out, which are currently missing from the Venusian landscape, but Venus's topography is already pretty smooth, simply because it's so hot, which reduces the strength of rocks, and additional weathering from CO2 rain won't change that.

Something the video neglects, however, is that those rocks will no longer be weak and pliable once the cooling is underway and CO2 rain begins! I would expect a lot of cracking due to thermal contraction, which would accelerate weathering.

How would the atmospheric color change?

In this scenario, the sky would be black and speckled with stars, because it would be permanently (artificially) night. But if suitable illumination were to be added back in, the sky would be blue due to Rayleigh scattering in the nitrogen atmosphere, just like on Earth.

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